Skip to content

Blogs

All articles
  • All articles
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Fundraising
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent bycatch
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Stop whaling
narnia-russian-orca.jpg

Russian Orca Captures: The Inside Story

Eight killer whales have been taken from the wild in the Russian Far East in the last year, seven of them since August. They are being held in small pools near Vladivostok and are awaiting their fate. The news, as revealed on the russianorca facebook page run by a group of Russian killer whale researchers, has prompted…

A Family Heritage

Belugas, particularly females, have high site fidelity – meaning they return to the same areas year after year.  This is common in many whale species; the young learn from their mothers the good hunting grounds and safe wintering areas and continue the “family tradition” of visiting the same places.  Belugas will return each year to…

There Are Dolphins Out There….

Hi Everyone,That’s me back after a very wet and windy break over on the West coast – the weather is certainly wintry now with fresh snow on the hills and it’s still very blowy – not ideal watching or photography conditions. My pal Alan has spotted some dolphins (about six, maybe seven) recently ambling past…

sightings_map

Directions to Here: Google Maps gives us a new way of sharing updates with our humpback adopters

What a strange year for sightings! This whale watching season was odd in that we didn’t see as many whales and as frequently as we have in previous years. The population of humpback whales that we research makes a yearly migration to feed in the nutrient-rich and highly productive waters of the 842-square mile Stellwagen…

a33

Orcas of Sri Lanka

For this blog entry, WDC friend and colleague, Georgina Gemmell, introduces us to the orcas of Sri Lanka. Very little is known about the orcas that are sighted off Sri Lanka’s shores each year, with only a handful of annual encounters, many questions surround this secretive population. But as more people take to the water…

Canaries of the Sea

Beluga whales are known as the “canaries of the sea,” a nickname granted by the high-frequency, sometimes bird-like squawks, chirps, whistles, and trills they make.  Researchers have descriptions of beluga sounds ranging from “rusty gate hinges” to children shouting.  Belugas can change the shape of their melon (the organ used for echolocation) by moving air…