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Guiana dolphin

Sotalia guianensis

Guiana dolphin

Guiana dolphin

See all species It’s easy to muddle up the Guiana dolphin and tucuxi because they look similar and live in the same part of the world.  Recent studies have confirmed that they are genetically distinct separate species. The Guiana dolphin lives in coastal marine habitats and tends not to venture upstream into rivers, and the…

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Franciscana

Franciscana dolphin

See all species The franciscana is a small dolphin with a very long, slender beak – in fact they hold the record for the longest beak in proportion to body size, of any dolphin. The franciscana’s beak is 15 percent of the total body length. Franciscanas live only in the shallow, coastal waters of the southwestern Atlantic of…

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Ganges river dolphin

Ganges river dolphin

See all species Ganges river dolphins are freshwater dolphins that inhabit the Ganges, Meghna, Brahmaputra, and Karnaphuli-Sangu river systems in Nepal, India, and Bangladesh. They are one of the oldest species of dolphin still existing today. Unfortunately, due to their endangered status, there are less than five thousand Ganges river dolphins left in the entire…

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Australian snubfin dolphin

Australian snubfin dolphin

See all species Almost cartoon-like in appearance, it’s impossible to resist a smile when you see the beautiful Australian snubfin dolphin. Up until 2005, Australian snubfin dolphins were believed to be an isolated population of the equally  charming Irrawaddy dolphins. Now we know that they are in fact their own separate species and researchers are…

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Melon-headed whale

Melon-headed whale

See all species Not actually a whale, and with no actual melons. Well, not of the fruit variety anyway… A member of the dolphin family, little is known about the regal melon-headed whales. Usually found far offshore beyond the continental shelf, they are most often spotted in the waters around the Philippines and the Hawaiian…

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Pacific white-sided dolphin

Pacific white-sided dolphin

See all species Energetic, acrobatic and extremely social, the beautiful Pacific white-side dolphins are a sight to behold. Similar in appearance to their relatives, dusky dolphins, these vivacious souls are found gracing the waters of the North Pacific. Other names: Hook-finned porpoise, White-striped dolphin, Lag, Pacific-striped dolphin Male Female Calf Maximum length 2.5m 2.4m Unknown…

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Commerson’s dolphin

Commerson's dolphin

See all species Commerson’s dolphins have unique black and white color markings and are easy to recognize; they are nick-named panda dolphins. Baby Commerson’s dolphins are not black and white, they are grey all over and change color as they get older. Commerson’s dolphins show typical dolphin curiosity towards humans and will readily approach boats…

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Tucuxi

Tucuxi

See all species South American fresh-water dolphins, tucuxi are as enchanting as they sound: playful, vivacious and highly social. Known as the ‘other dolphin’ of the Amazon, there is still a lot to be learned about tucuxi, including their range. Part of the Sotalia genus, the two supposed-populations have now been recognized as separate species:…

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White-beaked dolphin

White-beaked dolphin © Marjike de Boer

See all species White-beaked dolphins continue to be hunted and taken for food throughout their range.  Most worryingly, where hunts are known to take place, there are no restrictions or quotas of any kind. Other names: White-nosed dolphin; Squidhound; White-beaked porpoise Male Female Calf Maximum length 3.1m 2.83m 1.1m Maximum weight 350kg Unknown 40kg IUCN…

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Hourglass dolphin

Hourglass dolphin

See all species The hourglass dolphin is the only small dolphin regularly found south of the Antarctic Convergence, the line where cold and warm water meets. Other names: Southern white-sided dolphin, Wilson’s dolphin Male Female Calf Maximum length 1.8m 1.9m 1m Maximum weight 120kg 120kg Unknown IUCN conservation status: Least Concern What do hourglass dolphins…

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