Skip to content

Australian humpback dolphin

Sousa sahulensis

Australian humpback dolphin

See all species Despite only being recognized as distinct in 2014, the species is already classified as ‘Vulnerable.’ This is a very a worrying indicator of the level of threat facing them. Male Female Calf Maximum length 2.8m 2.6m 1.0m Maximum weight 280kg Unknown Unknown IUCN conservation status: Vulnerable What do Australian humpback dolphins look like?…

Read More

Pygmy killer whale

Pygmy killer whale

See all species Seldomly seen in the wild, the mysterious and naturally rare pygmy killer whales closely guard their secrets of the deep. Despite being the namesake of the well-known killer whale, pygmy killer whales don’t actually look anything like killer whales. In fact, like killer whales, they’re not even whales: they’re dolphins. Other names:…

Read More

Dusky dolphin

Ulla Ludewig

See all species Dusky dolphins are well known for their energetic and skillful leaping and tumbling activities; they are arguably the most lively dolphins in the world and are master acrobats. Often several dusky dolphins jump together in the same patch of the ocean but facing in multiple directions, rather like accomplished ballerinas performing a…

Read More

Pantropical spotted dolphin

Pantropical spotted dolphin

See all species Pantropical spotted dolphins are sometimes nicknamed ‘spotters’. The degree of spottiness varies from population to population around the world.  Some populations are hardly spotty at all. Baby pantropical spotted dolphins are born spotless. As they grow up, they accumulate light spots on their dark-coloured backs and dark spots on their lighter sides…

Read More

Irrawaddy dolphin

Irrawaddy dolphin

See all species Irrawaddy dolphins look just like baby beluga whales, only with dorsal fins, but they are not closely related. Irrawaddy dolphins are characterful and have unusually expressive faces. They can spit spouts of water from their mouths into the air. They seem to do this unusual behaviour when socialising and fishing. Other names:…

Read More

Peale’s dolphin

Peale's dolphin

See all species Peale’s dolphins are monochrome beauties endemic to the waters of southern South America. Weighing in at just over a modest 100kg, Peale’s dolphins are actually the largest of the southern hemisphere’s three species of the genus Lagenorhynchus. Harshly persecuted over the years, significant numbers of dolphins were killed by fishermen using them…

Read More

Atlantic humpback dolphin

Atlantic humpback dolphin

See all species With only around 1,500 adults remaining, Atlantic humpback dolphins are critically endangered and in desperate need of protection from burgeoning threats. Atlantic humpback dolphins could become the first species of dolphin to become extinct solely as a result of being hunted and/or eaten, to extinction. Other names: Cameroon dolphin, Teusz’s dolphin Male…

Read More

Clymene dolphin

See all species Leaping and twisting through the air, the truly beautiful Clymene dolphins are aerodynamic wonders. Only recognized as their own distinct species since 1981, Clymene dolphins have long been confused with spinners dolphins, probably , because the species is a result of a past hybridization event between spinner and striped dolphin. Other names:…

Read More

Chilean dolphin

Chilean dolphin

See all species One of the world’s smallest dolphins, there are thought to be less than 5,000 Chilean dolphins left in the wild. Turning black upon death Chilean dolphins were once known as ‘black dolphins’, as they were more frequently seen dead than alive. Once plucked liberally from the sea by fishermen using them for…

Read More

Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin

Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin

See all species A distinct sub-species, the Taiwanese humpback dolphin lives only in the coastal waters of western Taiwan. They are listed as Critically Endangered and there are thought to be fewer than 50 individuals remaining. Male Female Calf Maximum length 2.8m 2.6m 1m Maximum weight 280kg Unknown Unknown IUCN conservation status: Vulnerable Taiwanese sub-species:…

Read More