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Dolphins sync when they work together

Dolphins sync when they work together

A new study has shown male bottlenose dolphins synchronise their physical and verbal actions when they work together in a very similar way to humans. Using long-term acoustic data from studying a population of dolphins in Shark Bay, Western Australia, researchers discovered that the male dolphins in the group matched the tempo of each other’s…

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No self-isolation for Norwegian whalers

While the world deals with the global issues around a pandemic, it seems that whalers in Norway will not be grounded by the coronavirus. The Norwegian whaling season starts on Wednesday, April 1st with a number of boats set to kill up to 1,278 minke whales. Last year, Norwegian whalers killed 429 minke whales, fewer than in 2018…

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Good news from Greece on Captivity!

The authorities in Attica, the Greek region that encompasses the city of Athens, have taken away licences for the marine mammal (dolphin) facility at Attica Zoological Park. The move follows pressure from scientists, activists, and members of the public. Recently, vets conducting inspections dismissed the Zoo’s claims that its dolphin performances were educational programs and…

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Numbers emerge from latest dolphin hunt season in Taiji

Figures from the latest Taiji dolphin hunt season, which began last September, suggest that around 130 individual hunts took place with over 500 dolphins killed. Every year, starting on September 1st, fishermen in the Taiji region of Japan leave the shore to kill a range of different species. Once a pod of dolphins is spotted,…

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Record breaker Riptide the orca swims from Iceland to Lebanon

A male orca, commonly known as Riptide, has been spotted in waters around Beirut, Lebanon, on February 19th and 20th after completing what is thought to be a record breaking journey. Riptide belongs to an Icelandic pod of orcas that has notably been travelling unprecedented distances over the past year. It is believed his journey…

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Earthquake disrupts sperm whales’ feeding behavior

A new study has revealed how an earthquake affected the ability of a group of ‘dazed and confused’ sperm whales to find food for over a year. Kaikoura is a coastal town on the South Island of New Zealand known for its abundant marine wildlife, including a population of sperm whales. On November 14th, 2016…

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Minke whale calls drowned out by ocean noise

New research in Australia suggests noise pollution is affecting how minke whales communicate. We have known for some time that increasing ocean noise levels are affecting the behavior of whales, dolphins and other marine creatures. Orcas and humpbacks, for example, have modified their behavior to combat the noise by increasing the intensity of their calls…

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Whalers turn whale watchers

WDC and the Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Environment Fund are celebrating the launch of two boats that will be dedicated to whale and wildlife watching tours. The two vessels will operate out of Barrouallie, a place that had been known for the taking of pilot whales, orcas and some species of dolphins. However, since 2014,…

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Stunning new whale watching venue to be built in Norway

New plans to open a land-based whale watching attraction in Norway will promote the amazing opportunities to see whales in Norway. As a bonus, this could also help change the opinions of some Norwegians who still support whaling in the region.   The stunning looking building will sit right on the shore around 300km (~185…

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Are right whales ‘whispering’ to avoid predators?

A new study published in the journal Biology Letters, has revealed that North Atlantic right whales alter their calls to their young in order to protect them from predators. Normally right whales use an “up call”,  rising ‘whoop’ sound to communicate with each other. According to the latest research, right whale mothers will ‘whisper’ to their…

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