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New babies bring hope for endangered Southern Resident orcas

New babies bring hope for endangered Southern Resident orcas

A silver lining of this strange year was the news that Tahlequah, the orca who...
Mass stranding of pilot whales in Tasmania

Mass stranding of pilot whales in Tasmania

Over 450 pilot whales have stranded in various locations along a stretch of coastline in...
Success! France to ban captivity of whales and dolphins in marine parks

Success! France to ban captivity of whales and dolphins in marine parks

WDC’s continued campaigning to end the keeping of whales and dolphins in captive facilities for...
Belugas take ‘little steps’ into the ocean sanctuary

Belugas take ‘little steps’ into the ocean sanctuary

We are pleased to confirm that beluga whales, Little Grey and Little White, have taken...

Humpback whales swim up river in Kakadu National Park

Wildlife experts in Australia's Northern Territory are monitoring a humpback whale that has travelled 18 miles (30km) up the East Alligator river.

It is the first time a whale has been recorded swimming so far up a river in Australia. Two other whales that were originally seen in the river have returned to the ocean. The whales are thought to have got lost while migrating from their breeding grounds warmer waters to Antarctica where they spend the austral summer feeding.

Humpback whales in Antarctica
Humpback whales in Antarctica. Photo © Marta Hevia/WDC

Kakadu is a World Heritage Site famed throughout the world for its wildlife and the East Alligator river is home to a population of saltwater crocodiles. It is not thought the crocodiles pose a threat to the 16m whale unless it becomes stranded.

Boats have been banned from the are while a plan is devised to encourage the whale to head back downstream to the sea.

If you like humpbacks, adopt one of your very own! There are 9 humpbacks to choose from, each with their very own personality! By adopting a humpback, you support WDC's work to protect them.

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