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Tahlequah, the Southern Resident orca, gives birth to healthy calf

Tahlequah, the Southern Resident orca, gives birth to healthy calf

J35 and J57. Photo by Katie Jones, Center for Whale Research / Permit #21238 Tahlequah...
Why do female orcas live so long after they stop having babies?

Why do female orcas live so long after they stop having babies?

Orcas are one of only five species known to experience menopause and females can live...
Humpback whales swim up river in Kakadu National Park

Humpback whales swim up river in Kakadu National Park

Wildlife experts in Australia's Northern Territory are monitoring a humpback whale that has travelled 18...
Rastus – the tale of an extraordinary dog and his love of dolphins

Rastus – the tale of an extraordinary dog and his love of dolphins

Rastus Dr Nicolette Scourse is an academic, educator, author and illustrator with a passion for...
BELUGA WHALE SANCTUARY UPDATE:  Little Grey and Little White arrive safely after move to bay care area

BELUGA WHALE SANCTUARY UPDATE: Little Grey and Little White arrive safely after move to bay care area

We can now confirm that two beluga whales, Little Grey and Little White, are now...
Vessel Speed Limits Sought to Protect Endangered North Atlantic Right Whales

Vessel Speed Limits Sought to Protect Endangered North Atlantic Right Whales

"What we are asking for are essentially school zones along our coast, areas where vessels...
Columbia-Snake Rivers plan condemned as failure for salmon, Tribes, communities

Columbia-Snake Rivers plan condemned as failure for salmon, Tribes, communities

"We recognize our responsibility to help save them from extinction, and stand ready to do...
Tahlequah’s Pregnancy and Why I’m Cautiously Optimistic

Tahlequah’s Pregnancy and Why I’m Cautiously Optimistic

Photo taken under NMFS Permit #19091 SR3/NOAA/SEA The summer of 2018 was perhaps one of...

We were SO close.

Feeding North Atlantic right whale
North Atlantic right whale fluking
North Atlantic right whale

We were so close.

Because of the past couple of years, June makes me incredibly nervous.

In June of 2019, I heard the news of two right whale deaths in one day, only to find out about another soon after. June seems to be prime time for right whales to be accidentally killed by passing ships or through accidental entanglements in fishing gear as, of the 31 right whales who were killed since 2017, almost half were found in the month of June. As the days ticked away this month, I was cautiously optimistic.

We were so close.

Just five more days, just 120 more hours and we would close out June without a dead right whale. Tragically, it looks like that ship sailed, and it probably hit and killed a right whale as it did.

I am devastated to say that this morning, a dead right whale was located in the waters off of  New Jersey.

Derecha and calf copy
Georgia DNR - NOAA permit 18786-04
Georgia DNR - NOAA permit 18786-04

Two possible dead right whales from vessel strikes this year? NMFS says that even one death each year will jeopardize the recovery of the entire species. Yet, as the Agency labors through efforts to address entanglements, it has done nothing to further reduce ship strikes. Addressing one threat without the other, is like removing the crocodile from your salt water pool, but letting the shark stay. Right whales deserve better.

As we learn more details, we will be sure to keep you updated.

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