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Tahlequah, the Southern Resident orca, gives birth to healthy calf

Tahlequah, the Southern Resident orca, gives birth to healthy calf

J35 and J57. Photo by Katie Jones, Center for Whale Research / Permit #21238 Tahlequah...
Why do female orcas live so long after they stop having babies?

Why do female orcas live so long after they stop having babies?

Orcas are one of only five species known to experience menopause and females can live...
Humpback whales swim up river in Kakadu National Park

Humpback whales swim up river in Kakadu National Park

Wildlife experts in Australia's Northern Territory are monitoring a humpback whale that has travelled 18...
Rastus – the tale of an extraordinary dog and his love of dolphins

Rastus – the tale of an extraordinary dog and his love of dolphins

Rastus Dr Nicolette Scourse is an academic, educator, author and illustrator with a passion for...

Beluga Whale Sanctuary Update!

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We’re pleased to confirm Little Grey and Little White are now just days away from being moved from their land based care pool into their new open water home in Klettsvik Bay, Iceland.

We appreciate people’s interest and excitement in their move, as Little Grey and Little White prepare for this next step. Their welfare remains our number one priority, which is why we ask for everyone’s patience and understanding in us not publishing the date for the first stage of their move.

There has been a huge amount of preparation and planning which has taken place over the last 12 months. During this move to Klettsvik, we want to avoid any disruption which could cause the whales distress or interfere with our expert care team’s focus on Little Grey and Little White’s needs. 

Our care team and independent vets will be by their side throughout the very short journey (under 45 mins per beluga) from the land-side care facility to their new sea sanctuary care area in the bay. This first step is the ‘logistical stage’ of the two-stage process that will see them released into the main sanctuary in the bay. Once they have been moved to the sea sanctuary care area, Little Grey and Little White will need a short period to acclimate to their new natural environment and all the outdoor elements.

We plan to share the news of the whales’ final release into their open water home in the coming weeks once our team and the vets have given them a full health and behavioral assessment. We want to thank everyone for their continued support, and we can’t wait to share more news once they are in the bay.

We are excited for Little Grey and Little White to be in their new sanctuary home! Sea sanctuaries are an important step in ending captivity.

If you believe in ending captivity, please help us continue this important work.

Another way to help is by sharing WDC news on social media!