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My Gratitude List: Whales, Dolphins, and YOU

My Gratitude List: Whales, Dolphins, and YOU

That is until one day when I saw a different kind of article that piqued...
A Sliver of Hope from a Sad Start to Right Whale Calving Season

A Sliver of Hope from a Sad Start to Right Whale Calving Season

From there, our office anxiously waits every day as reports come from the latest aerial...
Big win for orcas –  the Klamath River dams are coming down

Big win for orcas – the Klamath River dams are coming down

This is a vital step to restoring abundant salmon in the river and boosting the...
Ending whale and dolphin captivity in the US – how our fight continues

Ending whale and dolphin captivity in the US – how our fight continues

Canada banned whale and dolphin captivity last year, leaving two facilities holding captive individuals: Vancouver...
From Whaling to Whale Watching

From Whaling to Whale Watching

One topic I find myself always coming back to is how our view of whales...
Dear Mr. President

Dear Mr. President

Dear Mr. President, I am writing to you on behalf of the marine mammals who...
Did I see my last right whale? Not yet.

Did I see my last right whale? Not yet.

For the first time in nearly 30 years, I haven’t seen a right whale this...
How many right whales are left?

How many right whales are left?

This week, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced that the population estimate (aka...

Whales, dolphins, porpoises and healthy seas under lockdown

Anyone watching blue, humpback or sperm whales can clearly see and hear the power-packed spout that comes just before they suck in a deep breath. Are whales and dolphins noticing  that the human world has slowed down? Has it changed what they see, hear, and experience?

Humpback breaching

If you are able to make a donation, it would mean the world to us.

It seems like years since my last in-person pre-pandemic meeting. In early February I boarded a plane for Perth, Australia, to join 30 other scientists in a week-long scientific workshop to identify whale habitats around Australia and New Zealand. With passing concern I noted that Wuhan, China, was reporting a rise in COVID-19 cases.

I remember looking at the map to see if Wuhan was coastal. It was upstream on the Yangtze River. The Yangtze River dolphin, or baiji, went extinct in 2006 but I briefly wondered if there were still some endangered narrow-ridged finless porpoises there. The IUCN Red List map indicated yes, possibly. Still, I could see that Wuhan itself was far inland in central China’s Hubei province. It seemed remote from our work mapping the areas that are important to whales, dolphins and other marine mammals in the South East Indian Ocean and all around Australia and New Zealand. This was our 6th 'Important Marine Mammal Area' workshop since late 2016 during which time we’ve identified and mapped habitats in the Mediterranean, the South Pacific and Indian ocean, and the waters around Antarctica.

humpbck_whale_antarctica

In mid-February, after our workshop in Perth, I flew home. Stopping in Singapore, nearly everyone was wearing a mask and passengers were being quizzed and checked for signs of the virus or of having travelled through China. My connecting flight from Singapore to Paris was half full due to many cancellations and I had four seats to sleep on. Landing in Paris there were fewer masks but there were storm-related issues in the UK leading to cancelled flights. I made it back home after a succession of aborted train journeys, replacement buses, and taxis. As the spread of the virus intensified in China and was starting to spread to Italy and around Europe, I was just happy to be home in Dorset.

With my colleagues at Whale and Dolphin Conservation and at Tethys Research Institute in Italy, we are all working from home, polishing up the 45 new areas that we’ve identified and getting them ready for the independent review panel that will decide if our recommendations are taken forward. For those that are approved, we will put them on e-Atlas and promote them, and begin talking to policy makers about protecting these important areas of ocean to keep the species who live there safe. We don’t yet know what will happen when our next expert workshop is scheduled to meet at the end of September in Costa Rica to map the marine mammal habitats for the Pacific waters from northern Mexico to the tip of Chile. We need to stay flexible for now.

Our ‘Important Marine Mammal Areas’ (IMMAs) are modelled after the ‘Important Bird and Biodiversity Area’ (IBA) which BirdLife has had great success with over the last few decades. Whale and other marine mammal habitats were relatively unknown compared with bird sites and the data remains widely scattered and much of it unpublished. What the IMMA has managed to do is to create a robust biocentric product that is based on expert assessments of existing data to identify the habitats vital to various populations.

It is as close as experts can come to determining what the whales themselves might protect if they could draw some lines around their favorite hangouts for feeding, breeding, raising their calves, singing and socializing.

IMMAs answer the fundamental question: what are the most important areas of the ocean to focus our efforts for protection?

Sperm whales have large brains

After the pandemic is contained and the economy begins to return, what will this mean for the future of whales, dolphins and porpoises and their ocean and river habitats?

At the same time as we focus on our own health and wellbeing, restoring the health of our ocean planet will be fundamental. Addressing the climate emergency with some of the urgency the world feels now would be a good start.

Some of the lessons we are learning from the COVID-19 pandemic apply also to the climate emergency:

  • we depend on good science and scientists.
  • we need to tell the truth and know it’s the real story — fake news sets us back considerably.
  • we are all connected — one person’s actions affect many others, even the whole world.

Thinking about it, I can see that all three of these lessons have implications in our efforts to ensure healthy seas for whales, dolphins, and ocean ecosystems.

Please help us today with a donation

If you are able to help, every gift, whether large or small, will help us ensure whales and dolphins have safe homes in the ocean.

Erich Hoyt wrote this blog before being furloughed under the UK government’s job retention scheme.

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