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Tahlequah, the Southern Resident orca, gives birth to healthy calf

Tahlequah, the Southern Resident orca, gives birth to healthy calf

J35 and J57. Photo by Katie Jones, Center for Whale Research / Permit #21238 Tahlequah...
Why do female orcas live so long after they stop having babies?

Why do female orcas live so long after they stop having babies?

Orcas are one of only five species known to experience menopause and females can live...
Humpback whales swim up river in Kakadu National Park

Humpback whales swim up river in Kakadu National Park

Wildlife experts in Australia's Northern Territory are monitoring a humpback whale that has travelled 18...
Rastus – the tale of an extraordinary dog and his love of dolphins

Rastus – the tale of an extraordinary dog and his love of dolphins

Rastus Dr Nicolette Scourse is an academic, educator, author and illustrator with a passion for...
BELUGA WHALE SANCTUARY UPDATE:  Little Grey and Little White arrive safely after move to bay care area

BELUGA WHALE SANCTUARY UPDATE: Little Grey and Little White arrive safely after move to bay care area

We can now confirm that two beluga whales, Little Grey and Little White, are now...
Vessel Speed Limits Sought to Protect Endangered North Atlantic Right Whales

Vessel Speed Limits Sought to Protect Endangered North Atlantic Right Whales

"What we are asking for are essentially school zones along our coast, areas where vessels...
Columbia-Snake Rivers plan condemned as failure for salmon, Tribes, communities

Columbia-Snake Rivers plan condemned as failure for salmon, Tribes, communities

"We recognize our responsibility to help save them from extinction, and stand ready to do...
Tahlequah’s Pregnancy and Why I’m Cautiously Optimistic

Tahlequah’s Pregnancy and Why I’m Cautiously Optimistic

Photo taken under NMFS Permit #19091 SR3/NOAA/SEA The summer of 2018 was perhaps one of...

Breaking down the racial barriers to Whale and Dolphin Conservation

The recovery of whale populations is key to mitigating climate change.

Climate change disproportionately impacts communities of color.

The whale world is disproportionately white.

None of this has been lost on many of us in the whale world.  I have had numerous conversations with colleagues over the years contemplating the lack of diversity in our field, perplexed as to why whale research and conservation does not attract a more diverse group of candidates. Is it the low pay typically offered by non-profits?  Is it the unpaid internships that are most often the doorway to jobs in the field?  Is it the cost of living and housing in the beach communities or metro areas where many of the research or conservation organizations are located?  Or is it that we have unwittingly held a private party for years and expected uninvited communities of color to find us?

All of the above but especially the latter.  We have prided ourselves on our doors being open to all, but have never sent out an invitation or offered support to get there. I am sorry.

Sorry, however, is not enough.  We need to make changes and I don’t pretend to know what they will all be, and how they will all work.  I can only promise you that WDC is committed to learning, changing, inviting, recruiting, and retaining, a more diverse workforce, internship, and supporter base.  Whales are important to our planet- to our own survival- not just to some subset of the human race, but all of it.