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Tahlequah, the Southern Resident orca, gives birth to healthy calf

Tahlequah, the Southern Resident orca, gives birth to healthy calf

J35 and J57. Photo by Katie Jones, Center for Whale Research / Permit #21238 Tahlequah...
Why do female orcas live so long after they stop having babies?

Why do female orcas live so long after they stop having babies?

Orcas are one of only five species known to experience menopause and females can live...
Humpback whales swim up river in Kakadu National Park

Humpback whales swim up river in Kakadu National Park

Wildlife experts in Australia's Northern Territory are monitoring a humpback whale that has travelled 18...
Rastus – the tale of an extraordinary dog and his love of dolphins

Rastus – the tale of an extraordinary dog and his love of dolphins

Rastus Dr Nicolette Scourse is an academic, educator, author and illustrator with a passion for...
BELUGA WHALE SANCTUARY UPDATE:  Little Grey and Little White arrive safely after move to bay care area

BELUGA WHALE SANCTUARY UPDATE: Little Grey and Little White arrive safely after move to bay care area

We can now confirm that two beluga whales, Little Grey and Little White, are now...
Vessel Speed Limits Sought to Protect Endangered North Atlantic Right Whales

Vessel Speed Limits Sought to Protect Endangered North Atlantic Right Whales

"What we are asking for are essentially school zones along our coast, areas where vessels...
Columbia-Snake Rivers plan condemned as failure for salmon, Tribes, communities

Columbia-Snake Rivers plan condemned as failure for salmon, Tribes, communities

"We recognize our responsibility to help save them from extinction, and stand ready to do...
Tahlequah’s Pregnancy and Why I’m Cautiously Optimistic

Tahlequah’s Pregnancy and Why I’m Cautiously Optimistic

Photo taken under NMFS Permit #19091 SR3/NOAA/SEA The summer of 2018 was perhaps one of...

Supporting Our Supporters as We Work to Protect Whales and Dolphins

WDC-NA staff's new "offices"

Working remotely is definitely an adjustment but I also know me and my team at WDC-North America are privileged to be able to do so.

Some things have changed. Our field work, residential intern program, and in-school presentations are paused for the moment to ensure that we keep everyone safe, but our conservation and outreach work have actually ramped up.

Some things are business as usual. We continue to reach out to the federal and state agencies who make decisions about everything from building offshore wind farms to allowing the imports of captive whales and dolphins. In-person meetings have been replaced by Zoom conferences and phone calls, but our position on ensuring whales and dolphins are protected has not changed.

However, it’s the business “unusual” that energizes me. Like the rest of the world, our crew also has family and friends directly and indirectly impacted by the global pandemic. Each of us have loved ones who are either high risk, out of work, working on the front lines, dealing with young ones out of school, or even infected. We know that our supporters do as well. Why I am energized is because our team has responded by coming together (virtually) to find ways to lift the spirits of our friends, our families, and our supporters. Staff meetings have focused on what we can do to support our supporters. From educational programs to fun distractions, our team has been brainstorming ways to make sure you know you are not alone - that we are not only here for whales and dolphins, but we are also here to help you.

You may have watched Sabrina, Monica, Colleen, Stephen and Michelle during one of their awesome Facebook Live presentations. Geared for a variety of ages, our presentations have ranged from identifying individual whales to how whale flippers inspired the design for wind turbine blades. You may have visited our new activity page  and downloaded a cross word puzzle or played the right whale matching game.  Hopefully our 'co-worker' post provided at least a small smile and momentary distraction and maybe our World Dolphin Day  let you imagine the smell of salt water and the feeling of a light breeze as you watched the dolphins swim by our boat.

Things will go back to a version of “normal” though. We will have residential interns, we will bring our inflatable right whale Delilah out so you can meet her, we will keep making sure there are policy measures in place to help whales and dolphins, and we will get back on the water.

RW Matching game
Livestream image

Until then, we will keep working to protect whales and dolphins. We will be here, not only because of you, but for you.

@uswhalesorg
@whales_org
@whales_org

What can you do?

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