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Captive Orca Nakai Dies at SeaWorld San Diego

credit: SeaWorld San Diego An orca has died while in captivity at SeaWorld San Diego....
A fluke of a North Atlantic right whale lifts out of the water

Federal Proposal Aims to Protect Endangered Right Whales From Ship Strikes

For Immediate Release, July 29, 2022 WASHINGTON- The National Marine Fisheries Service proposed a rule...
Common bottlenose dolphin

100 bottlenose dolphins hunted in Faroe Islands

This morning, (July 29th), 100 bottlenose dolphins were killed in Skálafjörður on the Faroe Islands. The...
North Atlantic right whale. Photo by Regina Asmutis-Sylvia

Update on Snow Cone – Critically Endangered Right Whale Who Gave Birth Despite Chronic Entanglement

July 2022 - Fisheries and Oceans Canada has reported that Snow Cone was spotted on...

Solitary captive dolphin Honey dies

Dolphin are selected from the chaos of the hunt for the captive display industry and they have the potential to endure extreme physical and psychological suffering

Dolphin Project reports state that a bottlenose dolphin named Honey has died at the Inubosaki Marine Park Aquarium near Tokyo in Japan. She was often described as the world's loneliest dolphin.

Honey was taken from the wild in 2005 in one of the drive hunts that take place each year in Taiji, Japan. In these drive hunts, huge numbers of dolphins and small whales are corralled by boats into a small cove. They are then either brutally killed or taken alive for theme parks.

The park where Honey was kept closed in 2018 which left her alone with only a paid employee to feed her.

Dolphin Project had tried to re-home Honey after being informed that the aquarium was in debt and seeking a buyer.

Captive whales and dolphins live shorter lives than they do in the wild, even without their natural threats. Wild dolphins can swim up to 100 miles each day which makes life in a small, contained space very difficult for them. Due to this, captive dolphins display unnatural behaviors. The captive environment can never replace their natural one.

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