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WDC2023-007 NMLC Release (16)

Seal Rescued in Marshfield Released Back Into The Wild

For Immediate Release, May 31, 2023 PLYMOUTH, MA - A young male grey seal that...

Norway ups whale kill numbers and removes whale welfare protections

The whaling season in Norway has begun on the back of disturbing announcements from the...
Image taken from an unmanned hexacopter at >100ft during a research collaboration between NOAA/SWFSC, SR3 and the Coastal Ocean Research Institute. Research authorized by NMFS permit #19091.

Southern Resident orca petition to list them under Oregon Endangered Species Act advanced

The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission voted today to advance a petition seeking to protect...
Hysazu Photography

WDC and Conservation Partners Continue to Seek Oregon Endangered Species Protection for Southern Resident Orcas

On Friday, April 21st, the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission will determine whether the petition...

Solitary captive dolphin Honey dies

Dolphin are selected from the chaos of the hunt for the captive display industry and they have the potential to endure extreme physical and psychological suffering

Dolphin Project reports state that a bottlenose dolphin named Honey has died at the Inubosaki Marine Park Aquarium near Tokyo in Japan. She was often described as the world's loneliest dolphin.

Honey was taken from the wild in 2005 in one of the drive hunts that take place each year in Taiji, Japan. In these drive hunts, huge numbers of dolphins and small whales are corralled by boats into a small cove. They are then either brutally killed or taken alive for theme parks.

The park where Honey was kept closed in 2018 which left her alone with only a paid employee to feed her.

Dolphin Project had tried to re-home Honey after being informed that the aquarium was in debt and seeking a buyer.

Captive whales and dolphins live shorter lives than they do in the wild, even without their natural threats. Wild dolphins can swim up to 100 miles each day which makes life in a small, contained space very difficult for them. Due to this, captive dolphins display unnatural behaviors. The captive environment can never replace their natural one.

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