Skip to content
All news
  • All news
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Prevent bycatch
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Science
  • Stop whaling
ng_sotw_keyart_horizontal_771e84e0

Enter to win a virtual ticket to the pre-screening of National Geographic’s “Secrets of the Whales”

This 4-part series plunges viewers deep within the epicenter of whale culture to experience the...
Image: Peter Flood

I signed a petition…now what?

More than ever before, critically endangered North Atlantic right whales have really stolen my heart...

Teenage captive orca dies at facility in Tenerife

Skyla, a female orca was born at SeaWorld in Orlando (US) in 2004 to mother...
southern resident

Southern Resident Orcas: Dam Good News for Restoring the Snake River

Hysazu Photography Hysazu Photography  "We are thrilled to see a concrete plan come together for...

Dolphins sync when they work together

Bottlenose dolphins breaching

A new study has shown male bottlenose dolphins synchronise their physical and verbal actions when they work together in a very similar way to humans.

Using long-term acoustic data from studying a population of dolphins in Shark Bay, Western Australia, researchers discovered that the male dolphins in the group matched the tempo of each other’s calls when the working as a team, as well as mirroring each other’s moves.

It is thought the males do this to keep rivals from females in their group while also competing to mate with them. It could be that these synchronized actions can, as they do in humans, lead to bonding, close cooperation and even reduce stress.

The research was carried out by an international team from the Universities of Bristol and Western Australia.

Help us protect dolphins around the world. Make a donation today.

 

Leave a Comment