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Humpback whale (megaptera novaeangliae) Humpback whale. Tonga.

Increased protected ocean area a boost for whale populations

Protections in the South Atlantic Ocean for one of the largest and most important marine...
A Southern Resident killer whale leaps into the air. The Southern Residents are an endangered population of fish-eating killer whales. Credit: NOAA

Southern Resident Orcas Receive Oregon Endangered Species Protections

February 16, 2024 - Contact: Regina Asmutis-Silvia, Whale and Dolphin Conservation, (508) 451-3853, [email protected] Brady...
Pilgrim and her calf in December 2022 © Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, taken under NOAA permit #20556-01

Critically endangered whale dies due to inaction of Biden administration

Pilgrim and her calf in December 2022 © Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, taken...
© Clearwater Marine Aquarium Research Institute, taken under NOAA permit 24359. Funded by NOAA Fisheries and Georgia Department of Natural Resources.

Critically endangered North Atlantic right whale found dead off Georgia’s coast

February 13, 2024 - On February 13, a North Atlantic right whale was reported dead...

Dolphins sync when they work together

Bottlenose dolphins breaching

A new study has shown male bottlenose dolphins synchronise their physical and verbal actions when they work together in a very similar way to humans.

Using long-term acoustic data from studying a population of dolphins in Shark Bay, Western Australia, researchers discovered that the male dolphins in the group matched the tempo of each other’s calls when the working as a team, as well as mirroring each other’s moves.

It is thought the males do this to keep rivals from females in their group while also competing to mate with them. It could be that these synchronized actions can, as they do in humans, lead to bonding, close cooperation and even reduce stress.

The research was carried out by an international team from the Universities of Bristol and Western Australia.

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