Skip to content
All news
  • All news
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Corporates
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent bycatch
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Science
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
  • Stranding
Humpback whale (megaptera novaeangliae) Humpback whale. Tonga.

Increased protected ocean area a boost for whale populations

Protections in the South Atlantic Ocean for one of the largest and most important marine...
A Southern Resident killer whale leaps into the air. The Southern Residents are an endangered population of fish-eating killer whales. Credit: NOAA

Southern Resident Orcas Receive Oregon Endangered Species Protections

February 16, 2024 - Contact: Regina Asmutis-Silvia, Whale and Dolphin Conservation, (508) 451-3853, [email protected] Brady...
Pilgrim and her calf in December 2022 © Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, taken under NOAA permit #20556-01

Critically endangered whale dies due to inaction of Biden administration

Pilgrim and her calf in December 2022 © Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, taken...
© Clearwater Marine Aquarium Research Institute, taken under NOAA permit 24359. Funded by NOAA Fisheries and Georgia Department of Natural Resources.

Critically endangered North Atlantic right whale found dead off Georgia’s coast

February 13, 2024 - On February 13, a North Atlantic right whale was reported dead...

Minke whale calls drowned out by ocean noise

Antarctic minke whale - Fabian Ritter

New research in Australia suggests noise pollution is affecting how minke whales communicate.

We have known for some time that increasing ocean noise levels are affecting the behavior of whales, dolphins and other marine creatures.

Orcas and humpbacks, for example, have modified their behavior to combat the noise by increasing the intensity of their calls when noise increases. Scientists in Australia have discovered that minke whales respond differently and are barely increasing the intensity of their calls.

They analyzed more than 42,000 minke whale calls over a 1200 sq km swathe of ocean near the Hawaiian island of Kauai and discovered that, as background noise intensified, the whales began to lose their ability to communicate over long distances.

While some other species tend to compensate fully for increasing noise, minke whales increase the level of their calls only marginally in the presence of loud noise.

In recent decades, ambient noise levels in the ocean – primarily caused by commercial shipping – have been shown to increase by roughly three decibels per decade.

We don't yet know what this means long term for minke whales and WDC is working to create healthy seas for all whales and dolphins to live in.

Related News

Humpback whale (megaptera novaeangliae) Humpback whale. Tonga.

Increased protected ocean area a boost for whale populations

Protections in the South Atlantic Ocean for one of the largest and most important marine wildlife areas on the planet have been expanded. A decision...
© Regina Asmutis-Silvia, minutes before snow squall

Right whale research in Cape Cod Bay

Right whale research in Cape Cod Bay Whale watching in Cape Cod Bay Decades ago, I started in this field as an intern and then...
A Southern Resident killer whale leaps into the air. The Southern Residents are an endangered population of fish-eating killer whales. Credit: NOAA

Southern Resident Orcas Receive Oregon Endangered Species Protections

February 16, 2024 - Contact: Regina Asmutis-Silvia, Whale and Dolphin Conservation, (508) 451-3853, [email protected] Brady Bradshaw, Center for Biological Diversity, (412) 722-9280, [email protected] Maggie Dewane,...
Pilgrim and her calf in December 2022 © Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, taken under NOAA permit #20556-01

Critically endangered whale dies due to inaction of Biden administration

Pilgrim and her calf in December 2022 © Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, taken under NOAA permit #20556-01 February 16, 2024 - Contact: Regina...

Leave a Comment