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Stunning new whale watching venue to be built in Norway

News pic

New plans to open a land-based whale watching attraction in Norway will promote the amazing opportunities to see whales in Norway. As a bonus, this could also help change the opinions of some Norwegians who still support whaling in the region.  

The stunning looking building will sit right on the shore around 300km (~185 miles) north of the Arctic Circle, enabling visitors to see passing whales without disturbing them or their habitat.

Norway currently hunts minke whales under an 'objection' to the International Whaling Commission's (IWC) ban on commercial whaling. In 2019, fewer minke whales were killed than in previous years, which shows the dwindling support for the hunts (and consumption of whale meat) in Norway, something which WDC highlighted in a recent survey.

This new attraction, called ‘The Whale’ could play a big part in helping people in Norway appreciate the value of having living whales jsut off their coast.

The site will cover 4,500 sq m and feature a large curved roof that will also allow the public to walk onto and view the whales from a higher vantage point. Inside the building there will be exhibitions that offer an insight into the lives of these amazing creatures.

The design is the brainchild of architecture firm, Dorte Mandrup and the development is expected to be finished by 2022.

[shariff]

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