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Japanese whalers kill over 200 whales in commercial hunt

Japanese whalers kill over 200 whales in commercial hunt

Japanese whalers returned to port today after completing the first commercial hunt since Japan left...
More Success! WDC’s negotiations with travel giant TripAdvisor pay off

More Success! WDC’s negotiations with travel giant TripAdvisor pay off

Online travel giant, TripAdvisor is to stop the promotion of whale and dolphin captivity shows,...
Norway’s whaling future uncertain after survey shows little domestic appetite for whale meat

Norway’s whaling future uncertain after survey shows little domestic appetite for whale meat

The future of Norway’s whaling industry appears to be in serious doubt as it struggles...
Financial worth of whales revealed

Financial worth of whales revealed

Policymakers and economists at the International Monetary Fund (IMF) have placed a substantial value on...

Antibiotic resistance in dolphins mirrors trend seen in humans

Bottlenose dolphins

Samples collected from dolphins by scientists over a 12 year period indicate that dolphins may be mirroring the trend in human resistance to antibiotic drugs.

Researchers looked at the samples from bottlenose dolphins living in the Indian River Lagoon in Florida between 2003 and 2015 and found that nearly 90% of the 733 samples taken from 171 dolphins contained a pathogen resistant to at least one antibiotic.

The Indian River Lagoon is subject to human-related pollution that causes environmental issues for the dolphin’s habitat.

The antibiotic that the pathogens were most commonly resistant to is one used to treat human illnesses like chest infections and sexually transmitted diseases like syphilis.

Resistant bacteria enter the lagoon from land via sewage systems where they creating resistant pathogens that dolphins are then exposed to.

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Related News

Japanese whalers kill over 200 whales in commercial hunt

Japanese whalers kill over 200 whales in commercial hunt

Japanese whalers returned to port today after completing the first commercial hunt since Japan left the International Whaling Commission (IWC) at the end of June....
More Success! WDC’s negotiations with travel giant TripAdvisor pay off

More Success! WDC’s negotiations with travel giant TripAdvisor pay off

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Norway’s whaling future uncertain after survey shows little domestic appetite for whale meat

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