Skip to content
All articles
  • All articles
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Prevent bycatch
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Stop whaling
Beluga Sanctuary Update – July 1st

Beluga Sanctuary Update – July 1st

Update: 1st July 2020 We have been working to relocate belugas, Little Grey and Little...
WDC funded research shows ‘pingers’ could save porpoises from fishing nets

WDC funded research shows ‘pingers’ could save porpoises from fishing nets

Underwater sound devices called ‘pingers’ could be an effective, long-term way to prevent porpoises getting...
We were SO close.

We were SO close.

We were so close. Because of the past couple of years, June makes me incredibly...
Significant Victory for WDC in Fight to Save World’s Smallest Dolphins

Significant Victory for WDC in Fight to Save World’s Smallest Dolphins

A significant victory in the fight to save dolphins in New Zealand from extinction! This...
Beluga Whale Sanctuary Update!

Beluga Whale Sanctuary Update!

We’re pleased to confirm Little Grey and Little White are now just days away from...
Whales, dolphins, porpoises and healthy seas under lockdown

Whales, dolphins, porpoises and healthy seas under lockdown

Anyone watching blue, humpback or sperm whales can clearly see and hear the power-packed spout...
Breaking down the racial barriers to Whale and Dolphin Conservation

Breaking down the racial barriers to Whale and Dolphin Conservation

The recovery of whale populations is key to mitigating climate change. Climate change disproportionately impacts...
Whales in Waters Around Russia Could Still Be Captured

Whales in Waters Around Russia Could Still Be Captured

A Russian ‘expert’ working group has concluded that the exploitation of whales and dolphins for...

Southern Resident Orca Scat Project: update from the field

Conservation Canines at work
Dr. Giles, a scientist with the Orca Scat Project, and CK9 Eba on the scent during a training run

Dr. Giles, researcher with the Orca Scat Project, part of the Conservation Canines program with the University of Washington's Center for Biological Diversity, gives us an update from the field and a recap of what the team has been up to in July:

When we heard the Southern Residents were spotted on the west side of San Juan Island in the early morning hours of July 5th, our scat detection team rallied quickly and got out on the water with the whales by 8am.  We found the whales right outside our home port and were able to conduct distant surveys downwind of several groups of socializing J and K pod orcas.  On our first day, with them, we were successful in collecting two large fecal samples, and on our second day, we collected a massive sample located by our new Conservation Canine dog, Eba.

Getting to see the Southern Resident orcas in their designated “core summer” critical habitat for two days in early July was bittersweet; we were thrilled to be able to see them, collect samples, and note that for the most part, the orcas look better fed than they have been in a few years.  But it was also sad to see them leave on the evening of the 6th, at the end of a two-day stay, because there was not enough fish to keep them here, in a region that was historically their preferred summer habitat.

We are proud to contribute to this important research.  Support for WDC’s Southern Resident orca project is provided by the generosity of our donors, The Jessica Rekos Foundation, and a grant from Metabolic Studio.

Conservation Canines SRO research program
CK9 Eba on her first field day <3
CK9 team scoops scat from Southern Resident orcas
A whole new meaning to the term "pooper scooper"