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Majestic fin whales

Icelandic whalers kill first fin whales in four years

As feared, whale hunters in Iceland have slaughtered at least two fin whales, the first...
hvalur-8-whaling-vessel

Majority of Icelandic people think whaling harms their country’s reputation

A survey of Icelandic people has confirmed that the majority believe whaling damages Iceland's reputation. ...
A magnificent sei whale © Christopher Swann

Japan Begins Commercial Whaling Season

Sei whale © Christopher Swann Japanese whalers have left port to begin this year's annual...

Pumps and conveyor belts. How could more whales help save us?

University of Alaska Fairbanks Master's student, Dana Bloch, retrieves a CTD that is used to...

European Union agrees ban on some single-use plastics

Representatives from the European Union’s 28 member states have agreed to a ban on some single-use plastics, including plastic cutlery, plates and straws, as part of a plan to cut plastic pollution in the ocean and increase the use of recycled plastic.

Back in May, the European Commission put forward the proposal for a European Directive on the reduction of the impact of certain plastic products on the environment.

Also included in the ban will be plastic cotton buds, drink stirrers, and single-use plastic and polystyrene food and drink containers.

Once the ban is formally approved, countries will have two years to implement it.

Almost 60% of the 25.8 million metric tonnes of plastic waste produced in the EU bloc each year comes from packaging. A large percentage is exported to third world countries rather than recycled.

Nearly all plastic found in the ocean is blown there from land where it then has a dramatic effect on marine wildlife. Whales and dolphins can suffer or even die after swallowing or becoming entangled in this manmade debris.

‘This is a milestone in efforts to reduce plastic litter, but the national governments still have a lot to do to make this work,’ says WDC’s plastics policy lead Pine Eisfeld-Pierantonio.

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