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Majestic fin whales

Icelandic whalers kill first fin whales in four years

As feared, whale hunters in Iceland have slaughtered at least two fin whales, the first...
hvalur-8-whaling-vessel

Majority of Icelandic people think whaling harms their country’s reputation

A survey of Icelandic people has confirmed that the majority believe whaling damages Iceland's reputation. ...
A magnificent sei whale © Christopher Swann

Japan Begins Commercial Whaling Season

Sei whale © Christopher Swann Japanese whalers have left port to begin this year's annual...
Humpback whales in Alaska

Pumps and conveyor belts. How could more whales help save us?

We are excited to announce backing for two ground-breaking research projects to assess the little...

Marine organisms can shred a plastic bag into 1.75 million pieces

A worrying new study by marine scientists at the University of Plymouth has found that the problem with plastic bags entering the ocean could be a lot worst than initially thought.
Researchers have discovered that a single plastic carrier bag could be broken down by marine organisms into around 1.75 million microscopic fragments and so increasing the spread of microplastics within the marine environment.

The scientists were examining the rate at which bags were broken down by the amphipod ‘Orchestia gammarellus’, which inhabits coastal areas in northern and western Europe, when they discovered that the organisms actually shred the material.

Between 5 million and 13 million tonnes of plastic leak into the ocean every year. That’s more than the combined weight of every single blue whale on Earth.

Find out more about plastic pollution and how you can help reduce the threat to whales and dolphins by visiting WDC’s NotWhaleFood.com