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Senate Leaders Introduce Bipartisan Bill to Save the North Atlantic Right Whale

Senate Leaders Introduce Bipartisan Bill to Save the North Atlantic Right Whale

After a deadly summer for North Atlantic right whales, Senators Booker (D-NJ), Isakson (R-GA) and...
The Summer of Scylla

The Summer of Scylla

You know how every once in awhile, you meet someone and you just click? You...
New beaked whale species discovered in Japan

New beaked whale species discovered in Japan

A new species of beaked whale who lives in the North Pacific has been identified...
Preparations continue for release of beluga whales into sanctuary bay

Preparations continue for release of beluga whales into sanctuary bay

Little Grey and Little White continue to do well and have settled into their temporary...
Southern Resident Orca Scat Project: update from the field

Southern Resident Orca Scat Project: update from the field

Dr. Giles, a scientist with the Orca Scat Project, and CK9 Eba on the scent...
Three Southern Resident orcas declared dead

Three Southern Resident orcas declared dead

The devastating news came late on Tuesday night ā€“ three more Southern Resident orcas lost,...
A Beautiful Coincidence: WDC partners with fan club dedicated to BTS RM

A Beautiful Coincidence: WDC partners with fan club dedicated to BTS RM

Iā€™m not sure if I believe in fate or coincidences, but in early April, all...
We <3 Whale Poop: WDC providing support for Orca Scat Project

We <3 Whale Poop: WDC providing support for Orca Scat Project

San Juan Island, Washington. July 22, 2019: Whale and Dolphin Conservation (WDC) is thrilled to...

More bad news as two humpback dolphin species are elevated to Endangered and Critically Endangered status!

Just the other day i blogged about how, as a direct result of bycatch, the IUCN had uplisted both the Irrawaddy dolphin and the finless porpoise to Endangered status. I thought that was depressing enough but more bad news was to follow with the elevation of Atlantic humpback dolphins to Critically Endangered status and Indian Ocean humpback dolphins being elevated to Endangered status – what is happening to our flippered friends? Why are we decimating thier populations with such ease and consistency?

It was only recently that the Indo-Pacific dolphin was separated into distinct species and this news of their precariously low population numbers brings home the magnitude of the situation facing humpback dolphins across their range. 

Atlantic humpback dolphins are only found in shallow, nearshore waters along the western coast of north and central Africa. Only 20 years ago the species was classified as Data Deficient, meaning that we didn’t know enough about them to classify them, 10 years later research showed them to be Vulnerable, today that status is now Critically Endangered with the species having seen a reduction of approximately 80% in the past 75 years. The recdution in their numbers – approx. 1,500 mature individuals remain – is a direct result of bycatch and other coastal developments.

The Indian Ocean humpback dolphin was only recently classified as a distinct species from the Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin and is found, as its name suggests, in the Indian Ocean from South Africa to India. as with other humpback dolphins, they live in nearshore waters and have a restricted range, meaning that human activities, and predominantly bycatch, are resulting in their population decline.