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Peter Flood mom and calf

Emergency Petition Seeks to Shield Right Whale Moms, Calves From Vessel Strikes

For Immediate Release, November 1, 2022 WASHINGTON-Conservation groups filed an emergency rulemaking petition with the...
The Yushin Maru catcher ship of the Japanese whaling fleet injures a whale with its first harpoon attempt, and takes a further three harpoon shots before finally killing the badly injured fleeing whale. Finally they drowned the mammal beneath the harpooon deck of the ship to kill it.  Southern Ocean.  07.01.2006

Moves to overturn whaling ban rejected

Last week, the 68th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC, the body that regulates...

Nearly 500 whales die in New Zealand

The number of pilot whales that have died following a mass stranding in New Zealand...

200 pilot whales killed in latest Faroese slaughter

More than 200 pilot whales have been slaughtered in Sandagerði (Torshavn) in the Faroe Islands....

Underwater noise threatens fish as well as dolphins and whales

Research findings published in the Royal Society B journal suggest that the underwater noise levels caused by man-made activities such as wind farm construction could kill fish by making them more vulnerable to predators.

In controlled experiments on sea bass conducted by researchers from the University of Bristol, recordings of pile-driving used in the construction of wind farms appeared to interfere with the ability of individual fish to co-ordinate their movements with one another.  According to the researchers, the fish became unable to exchange information and confuse predators, making it more likely they will be eaten.

High levels of underwater noise from shipping, pile driving, oil and gas exploration and military exercises can have a profound effect on whales and dolphins too, interfering with their communication, driving them away from some areas and even causing death. The effects of noise pollution on whales and dolphins have been a major concern for some time, and the findings of an official investigation into the UK’s largest common dolphin stranding stated the most probable cause of the event were naval exercises.

Research has also found that the average intensity of noise next to ships is 173 underwater decibels, equivalent to 111 decibels through the air – about the sound of a loud rock concert.

More on noise pollution here