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Captive Orca Nakai Dies at SeaWorld San Diego

credit: SeaWorld San Diego An orca has died while in captivity at SeaWorld San Diego....
A fluke of a North Atlantic right whale lifts out of the water

Federal Proposal Aims to Protect Endangered Right Whales From Ship Strikes

For Immediate Release, July 29, 2022 WASHINGTON- The National Marine Fisheries Service proposed a rule...
Common bottlenose dolphin

100 bottlenose dolphins hunted in Faroe Islands

This morning, (July 29th), 100 bottlenose dolphins were killed in Skálafjörður on the Faroe Islands. The...
North Atlantic right whale. Photo by Regina Asmutis-Sylvia

Update on Snow Cone – Critically Endangered Right Whale Who Gave Birth Despite Chronic Entanglement

July 2022 - Fisheries and Oceans Canada has reported that Snow Cone was spotted on...

Iceland closer to ending whaling?

The possibility of an end to whale hunting in Iceland took a significant step forward yesterday after the new Icelandic Fisheries Minister, Thorgerdur Katrin Gunnarsdottir indicated that Iceland’s whaling policy would be reviewed.

‘We need to have this debate,’ said Minister Gunnarsdottir in a meeting in which she took receipt of a petition signed by 7,000 people supporting a request by the Association of Tourism Services, whale watch operators, and Reykjavik City Council, to turn Iceland’s Faxaflói bay into an official whale sanctuary (allowing whale watching but not whale hunting within it).

The Minister went on to say that she understood the feeling behind the petition and that she would look closely at the issue. Significantly, she then stated; ‘it’s fairly clear in the long run that we are not going to live with this [whaling] policy forever and ever.’

Icelandic whalers have slaughtered more than 35,000 whales since the late nineteenth century. Iceland refuses to recognise the International Whaling Commission (the body that regulates whale hunting) ban on commercial hunting and currently allocates its whalers a quota to kill endangered fin whales (for export), as well as minke whales to service domestic demand mostly from tourists.

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