Skip to content
All articles
  • All articles
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Fundraising
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent bycatch
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Stop whaling

It’s Time To Breach The Snake River Dams

The Snake River dams were controversial even before they were built.  While they were still...
Save the whale. Save the world.

Climate giants – how whales can help save the world

We know that whales, dolphins, and porpoises are amazing beings with complex social and family...
Nat Geo for Disney+ Luis Lamar

Five Facts About Orcas

Orcas, also known as killer whales, are one of the most recognizable and popular species...
Alexi Archer cropped

Meet the 2022 Interns: Alexi Archer

I am thrilled to welcome Alexi to WDC as the newest member of our Marine...
Saya

Meet the 2022 Interns: Saya Butani

I'm happy to welcome the newest member of the WDC team, Saya Butani, who is...
Block Island wind credit: Regina Asutis-Silvia

Offshore Wind: Don’t Blow It

Recently, new areas were added to the growing list of potential sites for offshore wind...
Sierra

Meet the 2022 Interns: Sierra Osborne

I'm delighted to introduce WDC's Conservation Education intern for Summer 2022, Sierra Osborne! Without hesitation,...
Boto © Fernando Trujillo

Meet the legendary pink river dolphins

Botos don't look or live like other dolphins. Flamingo-pink all over with super-skinny snouts and...

Caithness Orca Watch week

WDC is once again participating in the annual Caithness Orca Watch week off the north coast of Scotland. Organised by the SeaWatch Foundation, the event is now in its 6th year and yesterday got off to a cracking start. Throughout the day there were hundreds of dedicated orca watchers up on the cliffs at Duncansby Head near John O Groats scanning the waters of the Pentland Firth. WDC’s Shorewatch team were also out in force helping track an elusive pod of orcas as they passed through the Firth.

The orcas spotted here at this time of year are from Iceland and we believe these individuals, who normally feed on herring in Iceland, come down to Scotland to feed on seals. We had just been watching a family of otters playing on the rocks at the base of the cliffs when the call went up that a group of orcas were crossing over from the Orkney Islands and heading straight for us at Duncansby. For the next hour or so we all watched in awe as the pod made a very close pass to us right under the cliff before heading further offshore and south towards Sinclair Bay. Later that evening we had confirmation from Dr Filipa Samarra of the Icelandic Orca Project that the large male we had been watching was known as The Hulk (062/IS015) – an orca I had seen many times in Grundarfjordur, Iceland but I had never before seen in Scotland.

This was another exciting piece of the jigsaw puzzle and great testament to the power of citizen science.