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Humpback whale (megaptera novaeangliae) Humpback whale. Tonga.

Increased protected ocean area a boost for whale populations

Protections in the South Atlantic Ocean for one of the largest and most important marine...
A Southern Resident killer whale leaps into the air. The Southern Residents are an endangered population of fish-eating killer whales. Credit: NOAA

Southern Resident Orcas Receive Oregon Endangered Species Protections

February 16, 2024 - Contact: Regina Asmutis-Silvia, Whale and Dolphin Conservation, (508) 451-3853, [email protected] Brady...
Pilgrim and her calf in December 2022 © Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, taken under NOAA permit #20556-01

Critically endangered whale dies due to inaction of Biden administration

Pilgrim and her calf in December 2022 © Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, taken...
© Clearwater Marine Aquarium Research Institute, taken under NOAA permit 24359. Funded by NOAA Fisheries and Georgia Department of Natural Resources.

Critically endangered North Atlantic right whale found dead off Georgia’s coast

February 13, 2024 - On February 13, a North Atlantic right whale was reported dead...

Spy-hopping: leaked document reveals Intelligence agencies involvement in whaling meeting

The meetings of the International Whaling Commission undoubtedly generate passionate debate from all sides, but “exciting” is probably not a term you would usually use to describe the proceedings.

However, a leaked document published on the Intercept website from whistleblower Edward Snowden, reveals that US officials attending an IWC meeting in May 2007 in Anchorage were supported by the US National Security Agency (NSA). One of the agency’s representatives was working with local colleagues to collate information gathered by counterparts from New Zealand on Japan’s lobbying efforts with countries that might support its position on various whaling issues ahead of votes later in the week. A selection of delegates from the US, New Zealand and Australia met to be presented with the findings each day.

While it is unclear exactly what information was passed to these delegates and how it was used, Japan ultimately failed in its attempt to get any exemptions from the ongoing moratorium at the meeting. The document concludes: “Was the outcome worth the effort? The Australian, New Zealand, and American delegates would all say ‘yes’. I believe the whales would concur”.