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Peter Flood mom and calf

Emergency Petition Seeks to Shield Right Whale Moms, Calves From Vessel Strikes

For Immediate Release, November 1, 2022 WASHINGTON-Conservation groups filed an emergency rulemaking petition with the...
The Yushin Maru catcher ship of the Japanese whaling fleet injures a whale with its first harpoon attempt, and takes a further three harpoon shots before finally killing the badly injured fleeing whale. Finally they drowned the mammal beneath the harpooon deck of the ship to kill it.  Southern Ocean.  07.01.2006

Moves to overturn whaling ban rejected

Last week, the 68th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC, the body that regulates...

Nearly 500 whales die in New Zealand

The number of pilot whales that have died following a mass stranding in New Zealand...

200 pilot whales killed in latest Faroese slaughter

More than 200 pilot whales have been slaughtered in Sandagerði (Torshavn) in the Faroe Islands....

Deaf students experience the beauty of whale song for the first time

Deaf students in the Dominican Republic have been given the opportunity to ‘hear’ whale song for the first time thanks to an innovative education project.

Using technology developed for music producers in the US, Maria Batlle, founder of Muse Seek (an education enterprise) has enabled students from the National School for the Deaf in Santo Domingo to experience the underwater chorus created during the annual migration of several thousand humpbacks from the northern Gulf of Maine to the Dominican coast.

Once onboard a whale watching vessel, the students pull on special, high-tech backpacks that turn whale songs into vibrations. As the humpbacks appeared before them recordings of the whale’s melodies, taken on previous trips, were played allowing the deaf and hard of hearing passengers to experience both the sight and sound of these majestic creatures for the first time.

Those wearing the packs used their hands to express the thumps, pings and gentle massage they felt on their skin as the whale song played.