Skip to content
All news
  • All news
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Corporates
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent bycatch
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Science
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
  • Stranding
WDC provides supportive care to a live-stranded common dolphin. Credit: Andrea Spence/IFAW

Whale and Dolphin Conservation Expands Marine Mammal Stranding Network Territory

The Whale and Dolphin Conservation team expands the Greater Atlantic Regional Marine Mammal Stranding Network...
Hysazu Photography | Sara Shimazu

Dam Good News for Southern Resident orcas

Pardon the pun (we've used it before) but we just can't help ourselves.  After decades...
Peter Flood mom and calf

Emergency Petition Seeks to Shield Right Whale Moms, Calves From Vessel Strikes

For Immediate Release, November 1, 2022 WASHINGTON-Conservation groups filed an emergency rulemaking petition with the...
The Yushin Maru catcher ship of the Japanese whaling fleet injures a whale with its first harpoon attempt, and takes a further three harpoon shots before finally killing the badly injured fleeing whale. Finally they drowned the mammal beneath the harpooon deck of the ship to kill it.  Southern Ocean.  07.01.2006

Moves to overturn whaling ban rejected

Last week, the 68th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC, the body that regulates...

No fin whaling in Iceland this summer!

WDC warmly welcomes the news that there will be no fin whaling in Iceland this summer, saving the lives of up to 184 endangered fin whales. Kristjan Loftsson, CEO of Hvalur hf, Iceland´s sole fin whaling company, made the announcement that no fin whaling will be happening in Icelandic waters for the second year running. The main reasons given are the endless obstacles within Japan relating to imports of whale products, which have particularly frustrated Loftsson, since Japan has long been his main outlet. Loftsson also cited the currently very strong Icelandic krona as a reason for increased uncertainty around profits from exports.

A record 155 fin whales were caught during the 2015 season, but last year’s hunt was cancelled due to import difficulties and it seems that despite attempts by Icelandic officials and experts to speak to their counterparts in Japan, the obstacles remain.

Last year, Loftsson complained bitterly about what he described as Japan’s unfair and antiquated methods for testing and analyzing meat.

Loftsson has stopped whaling in the past, only to resume once circumstances improved, so we should remain vigilant. It is important, also, that we don’t lose sight of the fact that the minke whaling persists: indeed the minke whalers have just announced that they will be going out as early as next month. 

Support our work to end whaling in Iceland once and for all

Breaching fin whale