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Mass stranding of pilot whales in Tasmania

Mass stranding of pilot whales in Tasmania

Over 450 pilot whales have stranded in various locations along a stretch of coastline in...
Tahlequah, the Southern Resident orca, gives birth to healthy calf

Tahlequah, the Southern Resident orca, gives birth to healthy calf

J35 and J57. Photo by Katie Jones, Center for Whale Research / Permit #21238 Tahlequah...
Why do female orcas live so long after they stop having babies?

Why do female orcas live so long after they stop having babies?

Orcas are one of only five species known to experience menopause and females can live...
Humpback whales swim up river in Kakadu National Park

Humpback whales swim up river in Kakadu National Park

Wildlife experts in Australia's Northern Territory are monitoring a humpback whale that has travelled 18...

Steps taken to stop dead whales exploding at scene of mass stranding

The carcasses of some of the hundreds of dead pilot whales that stranded on a New Zealand beach in recent days are being punctured in order to prevent them from exploding near volunteers helping with the operation.

Well over 300 pilot whales died last week when they stranded at Farewell Spit despite a huge rescue operation. Another eight whales stranded yesterday (Tuesday), possibly those that had already been re-floated by rescuers days before.

Heat and the gases that form inside the dead whales can cause violent explosions and so local conservation officers have been taking steps to prevent this.

The dead whales will soon be moved further up the bay, which is on the tip of New Zealand’s South Island, to a location in the nature reserve that’s not open to the public.

Find out more about strandings and how to help WDC.