Skip to content
All news
  • All news
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Corporates
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent bycatch
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Science
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
  • Stranding
© Clearwater Marine Aquarium Research Institute, taken under NOAA permit #24359. Aerial survey funded by United States Army Corps of Engineers.

Conservation Groups Decry Yet Another Preventable Right Whale Death

April 2, 2024 - Contact: Regina Asmutis-Silvia, Whale and Dolphin Conservation, (508) 451-3853, [email protected] Jeremy...

More success for our End Captivity campaign. Jet2holidays stops promoting dolphin shows

Jet2holidays has followed easyJet's recent announcement and become the latest major tour operator in the...
captivity_orca_man_standing_argentina

Success! easyJet becomes latest holiday company to turn its back on marine parks

easyJet holidays has announced that it will no longer offer harmful animal-based attractions to its...
© Forever Hooked Charters of South Carolina, injured North Atlantic right whale 2024 calf of Juno (#1612) seen with injuries on the head, mouth, and left lip consistent with vessel strike.

Conservation groups continue bid to lift stay in right whale vessel speed rule case

March 15, 2024 - Contact: Regina Asmutis-Silvia, Whale and Dolphin Conservation, (508) 451-3853, [email protected] Catherine...

Swimming with dolphins not a good idea says new research

Scientists in Florida looking at decades of data around interactions between dolphins and people have underlined WDC’s position that swimming with dolphins is not a good idea.

Swimming or interacting with dolphins is increasing in popularity. Unfortunately, most participants in these activities are unaware of the problems surrounding them, and the negative impact on the dolphins involved.

 

Using a database spanning 45 years the researchers found that an increasing number of the long term dolphin community in one area are becoming conditioned to human contact and that this puts them at risk.

Writing in Royal Society Open Science, the scientists said that the dolphins were more likely to be injured by human interactions when compared with dolphins that had not had the same contact with humans, and that this harms survival rates and population levels.

The report also cites feeding dolphins is a ‘major concern’ as it ‘encourages unnatural dolphin behaviours’ and ‘increases each individual’s risk for injury and death.’

The researchers looked at 32,000 sightings of dolphins involving 1,100 individuals.