Skip to content
All news
  • All news
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Corporates
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent bycatch
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Science
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
  • Stranding
Image: Peter Flood

Biden Administration Sinks Emergency Petition to Shield Right Whale Moms, Calves From Vessel Strikes

Image: Peter Flood For Immediate Release, January 20, 2023 WASHINGTON- The National Marine Fisheries Service...
A whale swims underwater while white text to the left of the whale says "AmazonSmile does make an impact to charities"

Amazon Announces End of AmazonSmile Program

Amazon announced on January 19th, 2023 that it is ending its AmazonSmile donation program by...
An orca lies in the surf as people look at it.

Orca Found Dead on Florida Beach

Credit: Flagler County Sheriff's Office On January 11th, a 21-foot-long female orca died after stranding...
A fluke of a North Atlantic right whale lifts out of the water

WDC Fights Back as Maine Delegation Strips Protections for Endangered Whales

Image credit: Peter Flood UPDATE: On December 29th, 2022, President Biden signed the omnibus appropriations...

Swimming with dolphins not a good idea says new research

Scientists in Florida looking at decades of data around interactions between dolphins and people have underlined WDC’s position that swimming with dolphins is not a good idea.

Swimming or interacting with dolphins is increasing in popularity. Unfortunately, most participants in these activities are unaware of the problems surrounding them, and the negative impact on the dolphins involved.

 

Using a database spanning 45 years the researchers found that an increasing number of the long term dolphin community in one area are becoming conditioned to human contact and that this puts them at risk.

Writing in Royal Society Open Science, the scientists said that the dolphins were more likely to be injured by human interactions when compared with dolphins that had not had the same contact with humans, and that this harms survival rates and population levels.

The report also cites feeding dolphins is a ‘major concern’ as it ‘encourages unnatural dolphin behaviours’ and ‘increases each individual’s risk for injury and death.’

The researchers looked at 32,000 sightings of dolphins involving 1,100 individuals.