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Majestic fin whales

Icelandic whalers kill first fin whales in four years

As feared, whale hunters in Iceland have killed at least two fin whales, the first...
hvalur-8-whaling-vessel

Majority of Icelandic people think whaling harms their country’s reputation

A survey of Icelandic people has confirmed that the majority believe whaling damages Iceland's reputation. ...
A magnificent sei whale © Christopher Swann

Japan Begins Commercial Whaling Season

Sei whale © Christopher Swann Japanese whalers have left port to begin this year's annual...

Pumps and conveyor belts. How could more whales help save us?

University of Alaska Fairbanks Master's student, Dana Bloch, retrieves a CTD that is used to...

WDC launches new app to record endangered dolphin sightings in New Zealand

WDC has helped to develop a new app that will allow members of the public to record sightings of the endangered New Zealand dolphin. As the name suggests, these dolphins are only found in New Zealand and consist of two sub-species – Hector’s dolphin and the highly endangered Māui dolphin.

The app was developed by the team at ThunderMaps in conjunction with WDC and the New Zealand Department of Conservation with the information gathered being shared amongst universities and scientists to help with conservation efforts.

WDC consultant and project leader, Gemma McGrath, explained how the app can help; “Locals are excellent citizen scientists. You’re out observing the environment every day. With correct species identification, you can provide real scientific data. Hector’s dolphins are very distinctive from other dolphins. There’s nothing pointy about their fins, they’re very smooth and rounded. All other dolphin species have pointed fins. It’s now really fun and easy to report sightings, at the touch of a few buttons.

The beauty of this app is that you instantly have access to your own sightings, can edit them, and you can see all the data. With all eyes on the water, chances are you’ll see other species. This app enables you to record other whale and dolphin species too!”

The app is now available to download for free on the iTunes App Store and Google Play.