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A Southern Resident killer whale leaps into the air. The Southern Residents are an endangered population of fish-eating killer whales. Credit: NOAA

Southern Resident Orcas Receive Oregon Endangered Species Protections

February 16, 2024 - Contact: Regina Asmutis-Silvia, Whale and Dolphin Conservation, (508) 451-3853, [email protected] Brady...
Pilgrim and her calf in December 2022 © Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, taken under NOAA permit #20556-01

Critically endangered whale dies due to inaction of Biden administration

Pilgrim and her calf in December 2022 © Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, taken...
© Clearwater Marine Aquarium Research Institute, taken under NOAA permit 24359. Funded by NOAA Fisheries and Georgia Department of Natural Resources.

Critically endangered North Atlantic right whale found dead off Georgia’s coast

February 13, 2024 - On February 13, a North Atlantic right whale was reported dead...
#5120 not entangled in July 2021 
© Gine Lonati, University of New Brunswick. Taken under DFO Canada Sara Permit

Entanglement rope of North Atlantic right whale identified

On February 14th, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) announced it had identified the fishing...

Possible lifeline for threatened orcas in Russia

According to a draft order from the Russian Ministry of Natural Resources, an orca ecotype known as Bigg’s (or transient) orcas, who roam across vast areas in the waters of Russia’s Far East will be given their own entry in the Russian Red Book – a document that lists rare and endangered species.

The draft order needs to have final approval from the Russian government but, if successful, will give them special status and mean that no more of these orcas will be allowed to be captured for commercial purposes, such as captivity shows.

Bigg’s orcas are part of a group that eat other marine mammals such as harbour seals, minke whales and gray whale calves rather than fish and, according to estimates from our Russian partners at the Far East Russia Orca Project (FEROP), only a few hundred of them remain in the seas around Russia. As many as 16 to 20 orcas – most if not all transients – have been removed for aquariums in the past three years which could have a dramatic impact on the rest of the population.