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Majestic fin whales

Icelandic whalers kill first fin whales in four years

As feared, whale hunters in Iceland have killed at least two fin whales, the first...
hvalur-8-whaling-vessel

Majority of Icelandic people think whaling harms their country’s reputation

A survey of Icelandic people has confirmed that the majority believe whaling damages Iceland's reputation. ...
A magnificent sei whale © Christopher Swann

Japan Begins Commercial Whaling Season

Sei whale © Christopher Swann Japanese whalers have left port to begin this year's annual...

Pumps and conveyor belts. How could more whales help save us?

University of Alaska Fairbanks Master's student, Dana Bloch, retrieves a CTD that is used to...

Japanese begin whale hunt in north-western Pacific

A fleet of four Japanese whaling ships have begun their annual hunt for whales in waters off the country’s northern island of Hokkaido.

The vessels will operate until October during which time they may kill up to 51 minke whales. This slaughter is carried out under the guise of ‘scientific research’, and the vessels leave port just days after a call by the global nature conservation organisation, IUCN, for Japan to end these hunts.

Both the Scientific Committee at the International Whaling Commission (IWC – the body that regulates whale hunting) and the International Court of Justice (ICJ) have also stated that Japan’s scientific whale hunts in the Antarctic should cease because they offer little scientific value. Most of the meat is sold on the open market, confirming that these hunts are effectively an excuse to get around the current international ban on commercial whaling.

You can read WDC’s Chris Butler-Stroud’s recent paper on ‘What Drives Japanse Whaling Policy?‘ on the ‘Frontiers in Marine Science’ website.