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Southern Resident Orcas

Northwest elected leaders to assess breaching the Snake River dams

Southern Resident orcas need Snake River salmon, and a new announcement from key elected officials...
credit: Hysazu Photography

Joint response concerning “no apparent shortage of prey for Southern Resident killer whales” in the Salish Sea

October 14, 2021 On October 12, the University of British Columbia (UBC) issued a press...
Leonardo Da Silva/Flickr

Alarming report raises worries for marine mammals held at the Miami Seaquarium

Leonardo Da Silva/Flickr A disturbing report on the conditions at the Miami Seaquarium from the...
Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Shocking footage of captive orca butting head against wall

Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals Distressing scenes have recently emerged from Marineland in Ontario where Kiska, the...

Dolphin with broken blowhole learns to breathe through mouth

A New Zealand dolphin has amazed researchers in New Zealand by adapting to breathe through his or her mouth after she or he was unable to use the blowhole, according to a report in Marine Mammal Science.

Whereas humans have the option to either use their nose or mouth, dolphins have evolved to just use their blowhole. It is unclear why this dolphin was unable to, possibly it developed incorrectly, but it seems to have adapted without any problems and is thriving. While dolphins are known to be able to blow bubbles, this is the first time one has actually been recorded breathing in this way, which requires the dolphin to move the position of its larynx according to the research. 

Citation: Dawson, S. M., Fordyce, R. E., Ridgway, S. H., Brough, T. E. and Slooten, E. (2016), Observations of a New Zealand dolphin (Cephalorhynchus hectori) breathing via its mouth. Mar Mam Sci. doi:10.1111/mms.12349