Skip to content
All news
  • All news
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Corporates
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent bycatch
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Science
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
  • Stranding
Peter Flood mom and calf

Emergency Petition Seeks to Shield Right Whale Moms, Calves From Vessel Strikes

For Immediate Release, November 1, 2022 WASHINGTON-Conservation groups filed an emergency rulemaking petition with the...
The Yushin Maru catcher ship of the Japanese whaling fleet injures a whale with its first harpoon attempt, and takes a further three harpoon shots before finally killing the badly injured fleeing whale. Finally they drowned the mammal beneath the harpooon deck of the ship to kill it.  Southern Ocean.  07.01.2006

Moves to overturn whaling ban rejected

Last week, the 68th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC, the body that regulates...

Nearly 500 whales die in New Zealand

The number of pilot whales that have died following a mass stranding in New Zealand...

200 pilot whales killed in latest Faroese slaughter

More than 200 pilot whales have been slaughtered in Sandagerði (Torshavn) in the Faroe Islands....

US Navy sonar illegal rules court

A Court of Appeal in California, has ruled regulations allowing the US Navy to use a low-frequency sonar for training violate the US Marine Mammal Protection Act.

The US Navy currently uses this particular type of sonar in more than half of the world’s ocean, which potentially harms whales, dolphins, and other marine mammals like seals and walruses.

In 2012, the US Navy had been authorized to use the high-intensity long-range sonar — called low-frequency active sonar, or LFA — for five years across more than 70 percent of the world’s oceans. LFA helps detect quiet foreign submarines and involves the use of 18 speakers lowered hundreds of feet below the surface.

Low-frequency sound pulses of about 215 decibels (dB) are pumped out over hundreds of miles of ocean, which can then disturb whales and dolphins as they rely on underwater sound to navigate, communicate, breed and for catching prey to eat. 

More on noise pollution here