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A Southern Resident killer whale leaps into the air. The Southern Residents are an endangered population of fish-eating killer whales. Credit: NOAA

Southern Resident Orcas Receive Oregon Endangered Species Protections

February 16, 2024 - Contact: Regina Asmutis-Silvia, Whale and Dolphin Conservation, (508) 451-3853, [email protected] Brady...
Pilgrim and her calf in December 2022 © Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, taken under NOAA permit #20556-01

Critically endangered whale dies due to inaction of Biden administration

Pilgrim and her calf in December 2022 © Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, taken...
© Clearwater Marine Aquarium Research Institute, taken under NOAA permit 24359. Funded by NOAA Fisheries and Georgia Department of Natural Resources.

Critically endangered North Atlantic right whale found dead off Georgia’s coast

February 13, 2024 - On February 13, a North Atlantic right whale was reported dead...
#5120 not entangled in July 2021 
© Gine Lonati, University of New Brunswick. Taken under DFO Canada Sara Permit

Entanglement rope of North Atlantic right whale identified

On February 14th, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) announced it had identified the fishing...

Experts raise concerns for beluga whales at Vancouver Aquarium

Animal behaviour experts abserving the activities of a beluga whale at the Vancouver Aquarium in Canada have expressed concerns that the whales are exhibiting repetitive behaviour — also known as sterotypy.

After visiting the facility one expert, Rebecca Ledger said that the belugas were ‘trapped, not fulfilled and were behaving abnormally.’

‘These are very intelligent animals, she said. we’re not talking about cockroaches.’

Of particular concern is the mental state of Qila, a beluga whale held captive since birth in 1995. Visitors to the Vancouver Aquarium can watch Qila swim repetitively in a clockwise pattern for a large part of the day.

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