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WDC provides supportive care to a live-stranded common dolphin. Credit: Andrea Spence/IFAW

Whale and Dolphin Conservation Expands Marine Mammal Stranding Network Territory

The Whale and Dolphin Conservation team expands the Greater Atlantic Regional Marine Mammal Stranding Network...
Hysazu Photography | Sara Shimazu

Dam Good News for Southern Resident orcas

Pardon the pun (we've used it before) but we just can't help ourselves.  After decades...
Peter Flood mom and calf

Emergency Petition Seeks to Shield Right Whale Moms, Calves From Vessel Strikes

For Immediate Release, November 1, 2022 WASHINGTON-Conservation groups filed an emergency rulemaking petition with the...
The Yushin Maru catcher ship of the Japanese whaling fleet injures a whale with its first harpoon attempt, and takes a further three harpoon shots before finally killing the badly injured fleeing whale. Finally they drowned the mammal beneath the harpooon deck of the ship to kill it.  Southern Ocean.  07.01.2006

Moves to overturn whaling ban rejected

Last week, the 68th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC, the body that regulates...

New study reveals impact of whaling on Southern right whales

In a report published today by Royal Society Open Science, researchers studying southern right whales in New Zealand have been able to estimate the impact of whaling on these whales and how their numbers have recovered in recent years.

Using various sources of data such as sightings, genetic analysis and known catch numbers, the team was able to work out that there were between 28,800 and 47100 whales at the start of the 19th century before whaling started. By the early part of the 20th century the population had been reduced to just 30-40 mature females. Further illegal whaling by Soviet whalers further reduced the population. Today, numbers have recovered to over two thousand, around 12% of the original numbers. The population is thought to be growing at around 7% p.a.

Southern right whales visits the coastal waters of New Zealand and other southern hemisphere countries such as Brazil, Argentina, Australia and South Africa to give birth every two to three years, which made them an easy target for whalers.

The New Zealand whales are part of the southwest Pacific population which includes whales that breed off southeast Australia. In New Zealand most of the surviving whales are found in the sub-Antarctic Auckland Islands, and the researchers believe some of these whales are new recolonising the waters around the mainland.

Read the full article
An integrated approach to historical population assessment of the great whales: case of the New Zealand southern right whale
Jennifer A. Jackson, Emma L. Carroll, Tim D. Smith, Alexandre N. Zerbini, Nathalie J. Patenaude, C. Scott Baker