Skip to content
All news
  • All news
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Corporates
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent bycatch
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Science
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
  • Stranding
whale and Japanese whaling ship

New whaling ship leaves port as the whaling season begins in Japan

The whaling season in Japan is now underway following the launch of the industry's new...
Minke whale © caught in a web Adobe Stock / dejavudesigns

“Our Ocean” conference in Athens: Governments halve budget for marine protection

Minke whale © caught in a web Adobe Stock / dejavudesigns While the US agency...
© Clearwater Marine Aquarium Research Institute, taken under NOAA permit #24359. Aerial survey funded by United States Army Corps of Engineers.

Conservation Groups Decry Yet Another Preventable Right Whale Death

April 2, 2024 - Contact: Regina Asmutis-Silvia, Whale and Dolphin Conservation, (508) 451-3853, [email protected] Jeremy...

More success for our End Captivity campaign. Jet2holidays stops promoting dolphin shows

Jet2holidays has followed easyJet's recent announcement and become the latest major tour operator in the...

Russia looks to buy more dolphins for combat use

Documents have been released in Russia indicating that the country’s military are looking to obtain and train dolphins for naval combat missions.

Reports suggest that the dolphins will take part in a new training programme and will be delivered before August to the Crimean port city of Sevastopol, which has housed a military dolphin training centre since 1965.

In July, 2014, Ukraine’s military leaders requested that Russia return ‘its’ dolphins, which fell into Russian hands when Crimea was annexed in March of the same year.

In 2012, the US navy announced that it would wind down its long running programme training dolphins to detect underwater mines.

Military dolphins’ are confined in captivity, which can cause them extreme mental and physical stress and, as with other dolphins kept in marine parks and dolphinariums around the world, they live shorter lives than they would in the wild. They also suffer infections, gastric impaction (swallowing a foreign object), pneumonia, spinal fracture and drowning, and often die during military operations and exercises.

More on dolphins in captivity and WDC’s work.