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Humpback whale (megaptera novaeangliae) Humpback whale. Tonga.

Increased protected ocean area a boost for whale populations

Protections in the South Atlantic Ocean for one of the largest and most important marine...
A Southern Resident killer whale leaps into the air. The Southern Residents are an endangered population of fish-eating killer whales. Credit: NOAA

Southern Resident Orcas Receive Oregon Endangered Species Protections

February 16, 2024 - Contact: Regina Asmutis-Silvia, Whale and Dolphin Conservation, (508) 451-3853, [email protected] Brady...
Pilgrim and her calf in December 2022 © Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, taken under NOAA permit #20556-01

Critically endangered whale dies due to inaction of Biden administration

Pilgrim and her calf in December 2022 © Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, taken...
© Clearwater Marine Aquarium Research Institute, taken under NOAA permit 24359. Funded by NOAA Fisheries and Georgia Department of Natural Resources.

Critically endangered North Atlantic right whale found dead off Georgia’s coast

February 13, 2024 - On February 13, a North Atlantic right whale was reported dead...

New research identifies three Antarctic blue whale populations

Researchers from Australia have identified three surviving populations of Antarctic blue whales, the largest creatures to have inhabited the earth.

Commercial whaling in the 20th century reduced the number of these whales from nearly a quarter of a million to an estimated population of just 360 whales when whaling ended in 1972/73. Recent estimates have put the population at around 2280, leaving it criticically endangered.

Surveys initiated by the International Whaling Commision saw teams from Flinders and Sydney universities carry out research on the whales in their summer feeding grounds in Antarctica. Even though they share feeding grounds, they then migrate to different breeding grounds during the austral winter.

Further research is needed to discover the numbers of each population and their migration routes to their breeding grounds.

The full report can be found at www.nature.com

Towards population-level conservation in the critically endangered Antarctic blue whale: the number and distribution of their populations
Catherine R. M. Attard, Luciano B. Beheregaray & Luciana M. Möller