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Peter Flood mom and calf

Emergency Petition Seeks to Shield Right Whale Moms, Calves From Vessel Strikes

For Immediate Release, November 1, 2022 WASHINGTON-Conservation groups filed an emergency rulemaking petition with the...
The Yushin Maru catcher ship of the Japanese whaling fleet injures a whale with its first harpoon attempt, and takes a further three harpoon shots before finally killing the badly injured fleeing whale. Finally they drowned the mammal beneath the harpooon deck of the ship to kill it.  Southern Ocean.  07.01.2006

Moves to overturn whaling ban rejected

Last week, the 68th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC, the body that regulates...

Nearly 500 whales die in New Zealand

The number of pilot whales that have died following a mass stranding in New Zealand...

200 pilot whales killed in latest Faroese slaughter

More than 200 pilot whales have been slaughtered in Sandagerði (Torshavn) in the Faroe Islands....

Whale calls recorded at deepest point of the Earth’s surface

The first audio recordings taken from the deepest point on the Earth’s surface have reveal a number of amazing sounds, including the calls of different species of whale. 

Little is known about what happens in the Mariana Trench, located at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean around 322 km (200 miles) southwest of Guam, but the recording do shed some light on what is a dark place (where the sun never shines).

The crushing pressure levels at such extreme depths prevent in-depth exploration and so a team from US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) decided to listen in at least by dropping a titanium-encased recording device (hydrophone) down to Challenger Deep, the trench’s deepest point.

Aside from whale song, over a 23 day period the researchers recorded the propeller of a boat travelling across the surface 10.9 km (6.7 miles) away, the sound of a typhoon raging overhead and the rumbling of earthquakes.

Listen to whale calls before and after an earthquake

The purpose of the research work is to help determine if human-created noise in the ocean is getting louder, and so measure the impact on marine animals that use sound to communicate, navigate and feed, such as whales and dolphins.

Find out more about the impact of noise pollution and WDC’s work on this issue