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Majestic fin whales

Icelandic whalers kill first fin whales in four years

As feared, whale hunters in Iceland have killed at least two fin whales, the first...
hvalur-8-whaling-vessel

Majority of Icelandic people think whaling harms their country’s reputation

A survey of Icelandic people has confirmed that the majority believe whaling damages Iceland's reputation. ...
A magnificent sei whale © Christopher Swann

Japan Begins Commercial Whaling Season

Sei whale © Christopher Swann Japanese whalers have left port to begin this year's annual...

Pumps and conveyor belts. How could more whales help save us?

University of Alaska Fairbanks Master's student, Dana Bloch, retrieves a CTD that is used to...

Spying – another fine mess for SeaWorld

Captivity show giant, SeaWorld has revealed yet more financial losses in 2015 and also admitted spying on those, like WDC, who oppose its practice of keeping whales and dolphins in concrete tanks for entertainment.

Financial results released for the fourth quarter, and full year of 2015, show a net loss of millions of dollars and over $9 million for the 4th financial quarter alone.

Meanwhile, SeaWorld CEO, Joel Manby has admitted its employees have been posing as animal activists to spy on its critics.

In a statement this week Manby said that SeaWorld would no longer use spies, but tried to explain the practice away by insisting that the decision to send people undercover was to maintain the safety and security of company employees, customers, and animals in the face of credible threats that the company had received.

Earlier in the week, SeaWorld announced a number of changes to its management, including the replacement of two top executives.