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A Southern Resident killer whale leaps into the air. The Southern Residents are an endangered population of fish-eating killer whales. Credit: NOAA

Southern Resident Orcas Receive Oregon Endangered Species Protections

February 16, 2024 - Contact: Regina Asmutis-Silvia, Whale and Dolphin Conservation, (508) 451-3853, [email protected] Brady...
Pilgrim and her calf in December 2022 © Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, taken under NOAA permit #20556-01

Critically endangered whale dies due to inaction of Biden administration

Pilgrim and her calf in December 2022 © Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, taken...
© Clearwater Marine Aquarium Research Institute, taken under NOAA permit 24359. Funded by NOAA Fisheries and Georgia Department of Natural Resources.

Critically endangered North Atlantic right whale found dead off Georgia’s coast

February 13, 2024 - On February 13, a North Atlantic right whale was reported dead...
#5120 not entangled in July 2021 
© Gine Lonati, University of New Brunswick. Taken under DFO Canada Sara Permit

Entanglement rope of North Atlantic right whale identified

On February 14th, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) announced it had identified the fishing...

New research reveals noise threat to endangered orcas

Findings from new research published in the journal Peerj highlights the negative impact that man-made noise could be having on endangered orcas.

The study looked at the effect of noise on the Southern Resident orcas of Puget Sound in the Pacific Northwest. Just 85 individuals survive in the wild and they inhabit some of the busiest shipping lanes on the west coast of North America. Previous studies have documented how low level frequency noise can have an impact on large whales, this one also looked at medium and high frequency sounds.

Orcas use echolocation to find their food, in particular chinook salmon in this area. Due to other environmental threats, the salmon have become increasingly rare in recent decades, so finding food is already an increasing challenge for the whales. The research looked at the sound made by a dozen type of vessels operating in the orcas’ home waters and discovered that the noise being created by many of these was so loud it was likely to be interfering with the orcas’s ability to communicate, navigate and locate their prey.

The research concludes that reducing the speed of vessels would improve the situation by making them quieter, as well as also reducing the risk of collisions.