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A fluke of a North Atlantic right whale lifts out of the water

Federal Proposal Aims to Protect Endangered Right Whales From Ship Strikes

For Immediate Release, July 29, 2022 WASHINGTON- The National Marine Fisheries Service proposed a rule...
Common bottlenose dolphin

100 bottlenose dolphins hunted in Faroe Islands

This morning, (July 29th), 100 bottlenose dolphins were killed in Skálafjörður on the Faroe Islands. The...
North Atlantic right whale. Photo by Regina Asmutis-Sylvia

Update on Snow Cone – Critically Endangered Right Whale Who Gave Birth Despite Chronic Entanglement

July 2022 - Fisheries and Oceans Canada has reported that Snow Cone was spotted on...
Humpback whale lunge feeding off Manomet Point Credit:John Chisholm/MA Sharks

Whales Make Waves Off Manomet Point

Humpback whale lunge feeding off Manomet Point Credit:John Chisholm/MA Sharks Update July 25th, 2022: On...

Seventh new calf in Southern Resident orca population

Yesterday, the Center for Whale Research in Friday Harbor, Washington confirmed a new calf in L pod, the third for this pod and the seventh for the entire population since December 2014.  The critically endangered Southern Resident orca population is divided into three pods: J, K, and L, and has seen a rare “baby boom” this year with six new calves observed in 2015, three in L pod and three in J pod (Scarlet (J50), who set off the baby boom, was born in December 2014).  The latest arrival, designated L123, is the first known calf of 12-year-old Lapis (L103).  L123 was first observed on November 12th, but CWR was unable to confirm the new addition until recently.

The new calves are certainly cause for celebration, but these endangered whales are still struggling to survive.  Before this year, the population had not had a surviving calf in two and a half years, and has lost more than 20 individuals since 2010.  Prey scarcity is one of the biggest threats to this population, and with seven new mouths to feed it is more important than ever to ensure the Southern Residents have an abundant supply of their preferred food, Chinook salmon.  Chinook can be up to 90% of the Southern Residents’ diet, and their survival is closely correlated with salmon abundance in the Pacific Northwest.