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We need whale poo 📷 WDC NA

Whales are our climate allies – meet the scientists busy proving it

At Whale and Dolphin Conservation, we're working hard to bring whales and the ocean into...

It’s Time To Breach The Snake River Dams

The Snake River dams were controversial even before they were built.  While they were still...
Save the whale. Save the world.

Climate giants – how whales can help save the world

We know that whales, dolphins, and porpoises are amazing beings with complex social and family...
Nat Geo for Disney+ Luis Lamar

Five Facts About Orcas

Orcas, also known as killer whales, are one of the most recognizable and popular species...
Alexi Archer cropped

Meet the 2022 Interns: Alexi Archer

I am thrilled to welcome Alexi to WDC as the newest member of our Marine...
Saya

Meet the 2022 Interns: Saya Butani

I'm happy to welcome the newest member of the WDC team, Saya Butani, who is...
Block Island wind credit: Regina Asutis-Silvia

Offshore Wind: Don’t Blow It

Recently, new areas were added to the growing list of potential sites for offshore wind...
Sierra

Meet the 2022 Interns: Sierra Osborne

I'm delighted to introduce WDC's Conservation Education intern for Summer 2022, Sierra Osborne! Without hesitation,...

Not again! Yet another drive hunt

Marna Olsen continues her reporting from Taiji, Japan

It was hard to believe, but again this morning hunting boats grouped together out by the horizon. Black smoke could be seen, which is an indicator of fast movement. Another drive hunt was happening.

The species hunted was Risso’s dolphins. The pod was very small, only 6-8 individuals. This was the 8th hunt of Risso’s since the beginning of the season on September 1st.

For a very short moment, when the boats had reached the coast, it looked like the pod actually would manage to escape. They were out of sight and had changed direction, but the swift moving boats quickly had the pod under control again. It didn’t take long before all dolphins had been driven in under the tarps where their lives ended. The whole process from drive formation to kill took about two hours.

It’s emotionally exhausting to witness three drive hunts within four days.