Skip to content
All articles
  • All articles
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Fundraising
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent bycatch
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Stop whaling
We need whale poo 📷 WDC NA

Whales are our climate allies – meet the scientists busy proving it

At Whale and Dolphin Conservation, we're working hard to bring whales and the ocean into...

It’s Time To Breach The Snake River Dams

The Snake River dams were controversial even before they were built.  While they were still...
Save the whale. Save the world.

Climate giants – how whales can help save the world

We know that whales, dolphins, and porpoises are amazing beings with complex social and family...
Nat Geo for Disney+ Luis Lamar

Five Facts About Orcas

Orcas, also known as killer whales, are one of the most recognizable and popular species...
Alexi Archer cropped

Meet the 2022 Interns: Alexi Archer

I am thrilled to welcome Alexi to WDC as the newest member of our Marine...
Saya

Meet the 2022 Interns: Saya Butani

I'm happy to welcome the newest member of the WDC team, Saya Butani, who is...
Block Island wind credit: Regina Asutis-Silvia

Offshore Wind: Don’t Blow It

Recently, new areas were added to the growing list of potential sites for offshore wind...
Sierra

Meet the 2022 Interns: Sierra Osborne

I'm delighted to introduce WDC's Conservation Education intern for Summer 2022, Sierra Osborne! Without hesitation,...

Important developments for naval sonar and impacts of pile driving

WDC was pleased to be asked to present at the first public forum (that I know of) on Sea Mammals and Active Sonar Symposium this week. You can see our contribution: sonar_symposium_2015.pdf. This is the first of two big noise developments that I want to mention.

Whilst we are always impatient for developments to mitigate impacts to move more quickly, and for navies to develop more robust planning strategies, it was a very welcome step that European (Norway, Netherlands, UK, France, Germany, Denmark and Sweden) and US Navies gathered to discuss the management measures that they each undertake to protect marine life during military exercises. Such collaboration and focus on robust ways to mitigate behavioural  impacts, as well as injury, is a solid step forward.

Things are less encouraging on the pile driving front. We now have the first calculated evidence of the potential for harbour porpoise populations to be seriously affected by the accumulation of pile driving undertaken to build wind farms by all nations in the North Sea. The report states that the impacts of seismic surveys for oil and gas deposits are of the same order of magnitude as piling to install wind farms.

Impacts for both avoidance (disturbance) and injury have been presented. The results predicted average reduction in the North Sea porpoise population of 23% from 2016 to 2022 under one scenario provided in the scientific report. This study does not consider the additional impacts that porpoises and seals face other than pile driving or seismic surveys, such as those due to pollution, being caught in fishing nets or because of reductions in prey availability.

The UK and devolved governments need to seriously consider this important scientific report – and revise their current marine mammal mitigation policies accordingly. The existing German mitigation measures to reduce the noise at the source (which are much more advanced and precautionary than those adopted in the UK) lead to a major reduction in porpoises that are disturbed. To be able to meet our legal commitments, and to protect porpoises and seals from disturbance and injury, all countries in Europe need to make much more effort to reduce noise pollution at the source when building offshore wind farms – either by not piling or by using source reduction mitigations.  

WDC have continuously raised concerns about the potential impacts of pile driving to porpoises and other species.