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Mass stranding of pilot whales in Tasmania

Mass stranding of pilot whales in Tasmania

Over 450 pilot whales have stranded in various locations along a stretch of coastline in...
Tahlequah, the Southern Resident orca, gives birth to healthy calf

Tahlequah, the Southern Resident orca, gives birth to healthy calf

J35 and J57. Photo by Katie Jones, Center for Whale Research / Permit #21238 Tahlequah...
Why do female orcas live so long after they stop having babies?

Why do female orcas live so long after they stop having babies?

Orcas are one of only five species known to experience menopause and females can live...
Humpback whales swim up river in Kakadu National Park

Humpback whales swim up river in Kakadu National Park

Wildlife experts in Australia's Northern Territory are monitoring a humpback whale that has travelled 18...

Australian government critical of Japan’s attempt to avoid court ban on whaling

Australia’s Minister for the Environment, Greg Hunt,  has condemned Japanese whaling and the country’s latest attempts to ignore an international court ban on its so-called scientific hunts in the Antarctic.

In March 2014, Australia was instrumental in a court action against these ‘research’ hunts. The International Court of Justice (ICJ) in the Hague ordered Japan to stop its whaling programmes in the Antarctic, ruling that they contravene a 1986 ban on commercial whale hunting. Representatives from the Australian government outlined in court how useless Japanese whaling is in scientific terms, stating that the ‘research’ programme only makes use of a small part of the whale. The rest is turned into edible products and sold, and a third discarded – thus confirming that these hunts are effectively commercial whaling in disguise, and just an excuse for Japanese whalers to get around the current international ban.

Despite the ruling, Japan’s government has repreatedly expressed its intention  to continue with its scientific whale hunting programme.