Skip to content
All articles
  • All articles
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Prevent bycatch
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Stop whaling
No self-isolation for Norwegian whalers

No self-isolation for Norwegian whalers

While the world deals with the global issues around a pandemic, it seems that whalers...
Russia to give orcas greater protection

Russia to give orcas greater protection

According to reports, Viktoria Abramchenko, the Deputy Prime Minister in Russia responsible for environmental affairs,...
Good news from Greece on Captivity!

Good news from Greece on Captivity!

The authorities in Attica, the Greek region that encompasses the city of Athens, have taken...
COVID 19- Canceling WDC Travel, Not Momentum

COVID 19- Canceling WDC Travel, Not Momentum

I am writing this on the evening of Tuesday March 10th, just hours after the...
Numbers emerge from latest dolphin hunt season in Taiji

Numbers emerge from latest dolphin hunt season in Taiji

Figures from the latest Taiji dolphin hunt season, which began last September, suggest that around...
Record breaker Riptide the orca swims from Iceland to Lebanon

Record breaker Riptide the orca swims from Iceland to Lebanon

A male orca, commonly known as Riptide, has been spotted in waters around Beirut, Lebanon,...
Earthquake disrupts sperm whales’ feeding behavior

Earthquake disrupts sperm whales’ feeding behavior

A new study has revealed how an earthquake affected the ability of a group of...
Minke whale calls drowned out by ocean noise

Minke whale calls drowned out by ocean noise

New research in Australia suggests noise pollution is affecting how minke whales communicate. We have...

Increasing the size of orca tanks sounds like a good idea, but…



(The statement below was excerpted from WDC’s official letter to the California Coastal Commission)

WDC encourages the California Coastal Commission to deny the coastal development permit sought by SeaWorld for its Blue World orca tank expansion project. We believe that what are relatively marginal increases in orca habitat (in comparison to an ocean environment) will not rectify the fundamental problems associated with the confinement of whales and dolphins in artificial environments.

In captivity, social structures are vastly different than those in wild populations. Individuals who would never naturally come across one another in the wild are forced into close proximity, which can lead to stress, aggression between individuals,  and injury. Marginally deeper or larger pools will do little to mitigate these concerns, particularly if the intent is to increase the numbers of whales kept in these tanks by encouraging an active breeding program, which could ultimately leave a growing captive orca population with even less space than they have now.

In the wild, whales and dolphins form complex societies that are based on kinship. Some species retain family bonds for life. In some orca populations family ties are so persistent and well-defined that all family members are usually within a four-kilometer radius of one another at all times. Captive facilities, with their logistical constraints and space limitations, cannot provide conditions that allow natural social structures to form. In captivity, social groups are wholly artificial. Facilities mix individuals from Atlantic and Pacific populations, unrelated animals, and, in the case of orcas, races (transient and resident), which have disparate diets, habits, and social structures.

The Blue World Project does not propose to eliminate the display of whales and dolphins to visitors in circus-style shows, which bear no resemblance to the natural behavior of these animals. These orcas still have no means of escape from one another, their trainers or the viewing public. Also, the Blue World Project does not prevent the practice of separating calves from their mothers at a young age or prematurely impregnating young orcas as part of their breeding programs.

It is noteworthy that SeaWorld’s Blue World Project only addresses the habitats of the orcas it holds in captivity. All cetaceans, whether orcas, bottlenose dolphins or belugas at SeaWorld’s facilities possess the same physiological and behavioral requirements that can only be met through the great depths and expanses provided by an ocean realm.  We find it telling that SeaWorld has only chosen to focus its attention to remedy its inadequate tanks for the orcas it holds.  This response to recent public attention and scrutiny resulting from the death of trainer Dawn Brancheau and the movie Blackfish, among other developments, suggests Blue Worl Project may also serve as a public relations maneuver rather than a true effort to improve the lives of the individuals confined to their parks.

infographic on captivity