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Peter Flood mom and calf

Emergency Petition Seeks to Shield Right Whale Moms, Calves From Vessel Strikes

For Immediate Release, November 1, 2022 WASHINGTON-Conservation groups filed an emergency rulemaking petition with the...
The Yushin Maru catcher ship of the Japanese whaling fleet injures a whale with its first harpoon attempt, and takes a further three harpoon shots before finally killing the badly injured fleeing whale. Finally they drowned the mammal beneath the harpooon deck of the ship to kill it.  Southern Ocean.  07.01.2006

Moves to overturn whaling ban rejected

Last week, the 68th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC, the body that regulates...

Nearly 500 whales die in New Zealand

The number of pilot whales that have died following a mass stranding in New Zealand...

200 pilot whales killed in latest Faroese slaughter

More than 200 pilot whales have been slaughtered in Sandagerði (Torshavn) in the Faroe Islands....

Prehistoric beaked whale found with last meal

A beaked whale, Messapicetus gregarius that lived round 9 million years ago, has been discovered with remnants of what researchers believe may have been its last meal. The fossil of the whale was found in rocks in southwestern Peru last year.

Writing in the the scientific journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B., their findings reveal that a large number of sardine-like fish were found around its head and in its chest. It is the discovery of these fish that is most significant as they are thought to have lived near the surface of the ocean, much like their descendants do. This provides new information of the evolution of beaked whales as their modern-day relatives generally live and feed in deep water. Indeed, the Cuvier’s beaked whale holds the record for the deepest dive of a whale ever recorded.

The researchers think that the evolution of dolphins soon after and their success in the shallow coastal waters forced the beaked whales to head for deeper depths where they flourished.

The full scientific report can be read at: http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/282/1815/20151530

Cuvier’s beaked whale © Tim Stenton