Skip to content
All news
  • All news
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Corporates
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent bycatch
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Science
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
  • Stranding
Peter Flood mom and calf

Emergency Petition Seeks to Shield Right Whale Moms, Calves From Vessel Strikes

For Immediate Release, November 1, 2022 WASHINGTON-Conservation groups filed an emergency rulemaking petition with the...
The Yushin Maru catcher ship of the Japanese whaling fleet injures a whale with its first harpoon attempt, and takes a further three harpoon shots before finally killing the badly injured fleeing whale. Finally they drowned the mammal beneath the harpooon deck of the ship to kill it.  Southern Ocean.  07.01.2006

Moves to overturn whaling ban rejected

Last week, the 68th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC, the body that regulates...

Nearly 500 whales die in New Zealand

The number of pilot whales that have died following a mass stranding in New Zealand...

200 pilot whales killed in latest Faroese slaughter

More than 200 pilot whales have been slaughtered in Sandagerði (Torshavn) in the Faroe Islands....

Talks on banned Japanese research whaling come to an end

Talks in the US between Japanese government representatives and scientific experts from the International Whaling Commission (IWC – the body that regulates whale hunting) concerning Japan’s so-called ‘scientific research whaling’ have come to an end. The discussions were part of this year´s meeting of the IWC´s Scientific Committee meeting which took place in San Diego.

Japan is seeking to push the case for continuing its scientific whaling in the Southern Ocean despite a landmark ruling by the UN’s International Court of Justice last year ordering the hunts to stop on the grounds that it was commercial whale slaughter masquerading as research.

The hearings exposed the true nature of the Japanese ‘research’ programmes  under which it has previously killed over 10,000 whales in Antarctica, outlining just how useless Japanese whaling is in scientific terms.

Japanese officials have spent the last few weeks trying to convince the IWC that there is a genuine need for the research despite the fact that most of the whales slaughtered end up being sold commercially for their meat.

The outcome of the meeting will be confidential until the meeting report is published on June 19th. The report will then be presented to and discussed by the next IWC plenary meeting in September 2016.

Approval would be a boost for Japan’s whaling industry and supporters, but rejection by the IWC would be a major setback.

Japanese whaling