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Image: Peter Flood

Biden Administration Sinks Emergency Petition to Shield Right Whale Moms, Calves From Vessel Strikes

Image: Peter Flood For Immediate Release, January 20, 2023 WASHINGTON- The National Marine Fisheries Service...
A whale swims underwater while white text to the left of the whale says "AmazonSmile does make an impact to charities"

Amazon Announces End of AmazonSmile Program

Amazon announced on January 19th, 2023 that it is ending its AmazonSmile donation program by...

Automated cruelty – vending machines in Japan now dispense dead whale

In an effort to prop up the cruel and declining whaling industry in Japan, one...
An orca lies in the surf as people look at it.

Orca Found Dead on Florida Beach

Credit: Flagler County Sheriff's Office On January 11th, a 21-foot-long female orca died after stranding...

New Zealand urged to take immediate action to protect the remaining Maui’s dolphins

New research presented to the Scientific Committee of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) which is currently meeting in San Diego, USA, strongly urges the New Zealand to take more immediate action to halt the decline in the critically endangered Maui’s dolphin.

Maui’s dolphins are only found around the shallow coastal waters of New Zeland’s North Island where their predominant threat is bycatch or entanglement in set gill-nets, a static fishing gear used widely within habitat critical to this tiny population of dolphins. Maui’s dolphins have never been as abundant as their cousins the Hector’s dolphin, from the South Island however their numbers are declining rapidly and experts predict that unless further measures are taken to protect them, the Maui’s dolphin will be extinct within the next 15 years – if not sooner. With only 43 – 47 individuals left, and only 10 of these mature females able to reproduce and add to the gene pool, the clock is ticking very loudly. 

Please add your voice to help save the critically endangered New Zealand Dolphin.