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North Atlantic right whale fluking

Six Questions With Dr. Michael Moore

We talked with Dr. Michael Moore of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution about his new book...
Humpback whale breaches out of the water

COP26 -Save the whales, save the world!

COP26 - the UN Climate Change Conference kicked off this week in Glasgow. This global...
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Happy Trash-tober!

To celebrate spooky season, our WDC North America team decided to do our part to...
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Join WDC for STEM Week 2021!

Hey! Join me and Whale & Dolphin Conservation for STEM Week 2021! If you're interested...
Dead dolphins on the beach

Faroe Islands whale and dolphin slaughter – what have we done and what are we doing?

The massacre of 1,428 Atlantic white-sided dolphins at Skálafjørður on the Faroe Islands on 12th...
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Orcas, sea lions, and viral videos

"What do I do?!" You may have seen the latest viral animal video involving a...
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The horror – reflecting on the massacre of 1,428 dolphins on the Faroe Islands

Like you and millions of people around the globe, I felt horrified by the news...
2021 Interns- first day

Meet the 2021 WDC Interns!

Every spring and summer, we get to open up our office to interns from all...

Stop the River Dolphin Slaughter: WDC presents Brazilian Public Prosecution Service with 176,599 signatures

WDC is working with Rafael da Silva Rocha, of the Brazilian Public Prosecution Service, and other partners in Brazil to stop the brutal slaughter of Amazon River dolphins, known locally as ‘botos’. Thank you to everyone who signed our letter of support to Rafael. Our Brazilian colleague Sannie Brum (from the Piagacu Institute in Brazil) presented Rafael with 176,599 signatures along with messages of support for his work.  In some areas of the Brazilian Amazon, river dolphins are illegally killed and used as bait in the piracatinga fishery. 

Piracatinga is a type of catfish and a new law (January 2015) has been passed banning catching them commercially, but in areas as remote as these it will be incredibly hard to police and enforce. This deliberate killing is the biggest threat to river dolphins in Brazil. The new law banning of the commercail piracatinga fishery is an attempt to reduce the demand for boto carcasses. WDC is working with Sannie and the Piagacu Institute to develop projects that will engage local people in protecting the dolphins who share their Amazon home, and the support you have shown Rafael and others trying to make a difference is extremely important to their efforts.

Find out more about river dolphins.