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How do you thank someone who has changed your life?

How do you thank someone who has changed your life?

*This is the third part of a three-part blog series. You can read the first...
Dipping my toes into the policy pool

Dipping my toes into the policy pool

Just a few short months after I packed everything I owned and drove from California...
Mel on the boat with a whale

From the Pacific Coast to the North Atlantic Right Whale

WDC’s internship is designed to give interns a taste of life at a marine mammal...
From One Mother to Another

From One Mother to Another

See the part that is sticking out? It isn't supposed to look like that. Georgia...
Japan’s government agrees to more funding for whale hunts

Japan’s government agrees to more funding for whale hunts

Japan’s Diet (parliament) has passed a law to help support commercial whaling through increased funding...
New research shows bottlenose dolphins turn to the right

New research shows bottlenose dolphins turn to the right

New research has revealed that dolphins have a dominant right-hand side.  The research shows that...
Whalers turn whale watchers

Whalers turn whale watchers

WDC and the Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Environment Fund are celebrating the launch of...
Moving in the wrong direction: new application would bring belugas to US marine parks

Moving in the wrong direction: new application would bring belugas to US marine parks

Earlier this year, WDC celebrated the passage of a landmark law to ban whale and...

Stop the River Dolphin Slaughter: WDC presents Brazilian Public Prosecution Service with 176,599 signatures

WDC is working with Rafael da Silva Rocha, of the Brazilian Public Prosecution Service, and other partners in Brazil to stop the brutal slaughter of Amazon River dolphins, known locally as ‘botos’. Thank you to everyone who signed our letter of support to Rafael. Our Brazilian colleague Sannie Brum (from the Piagacu Institute in Brazil) presented Rafael with 176,599 signatures along with messages of support for his work.  In some areas of the Brazilian Amazon, river dolphins are illegally killed and used as bait in the piracatinga fishery. 

Piracatinga is a type of catfish and a new law (January 2015) has been passed banning catching them commercially, but in areas as remote as these it will be incredibly hard to police and enforce. This deliberate killing is the biggest threat to river dolphins in Brazil. The new law banning of the commercail piracatinga fishery is an attempt to reduce the demand for boto carcasses. WDC is working with Sannie and the Piagacu Institute to develop projects that will engage local people in protecting the dolphins who share their Amazon home, and the support you have shown Rafael and others trying to make a difference is extremely important to their efforts.

Find out more about river dolphins.