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Captive Orca Nakai Dies at SeaWorld San Diego

credit: SeaWorld San Diego An orca has died while in captivity at SeaWorld San Diego....
A fluke of a North Atlantic right whale lifts out of the water

Federal Proposal Aims to Protect Endangered Right Whales From Ship Strikes

For Immediate Release, July 29, 2022 WASHINGTON- The National Marine Fisheries Service proposed a rule...
Common bottlenose dolphin

100 bottlenose dolphins hunted in Faroe Islands

This morning, (July 29th), 100 bottlenose dolphins were killed in Skálafjörður on the Faroe Islands. The...
North Atlantic right whale. Photo by Regina Asmutis-Sylvia

Update on Snow Cone – Critically Endangered Right Whale Who Gave Birth Despite Chronic Entanglement

July 2022 - Fisheries and Oceans Canada has reported that Snow Cone was spotted on...

Dead dolphin in Adelaide’s Port River was shot

A necropsy (post-mortem) has discovered that a bottlenose dolphin found dead in Adelaide’s Port River last December had been shot.

The dolphin, named Graze by researchers, was discovered in the Barker Inlet but only examined this month by staff from the South Australian Museum. Four shotgun pellets were found in the dolphin.

WDC’s Dr Mike Bossley said “When we found the body before Christmas it was hard to know why it died, that’s why they did a necropsy.” 

Graze was first sighted by Dr Bossley in 1992 and has been following her movements along with the other dolphins found in the river since then.

“It is clear despite the implementation of the Adelaide Dolphin Sanctuary these dolphins are still under threat,” he said. “It is important that more resources are put into the sanctuary to improve its effectiveness.”

It is hoped that an interpretive visitors centre could be established to promote Adelaide’s dolphins and increase awareness the need to protect them.

You can support Dr Bossley’s work by adopting one of the Port River dolphins.