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Humpback whale (megaptera novaeangliae) Humpback whale. Tonga.

Increased protected ocean area a boost for whale populations

Protections in the South Atlantic Ocean for one of the largest and most important marine...
A Southern Resident killer whale leaps into the air. The Southern Residents are an endangered population of fish-eating killer whales. Credit: NOAA

Southern Resident Orcas Receive Oregon Endangered Species Protections

February 16, 2024 - Contact: Regina Asmutis-Silvia, Whale and Dolphin Conservation, (508) 451-3853, [email protected] Brady...
Pilgrim and her calf in December 2022 © Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, taken under NOAA permit #20556-01

Critically endangered whale dies due to inaction of Biden administration

Pilgrim and her calf in December 2022 © Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, taken...
© Clearwater Marine Aquarium Research Institute, taken under NOAA permit 24359. Funded by NOAA Fisheries and Georgia Department of Natural Resources.

Critically endangered North Atlantic right whale found dead off Georgia’s coast

February 13, 2024 - On February 13, a North Atlantic right whale was reported dead...

17 million year old whale found…459 miles from the sea!

Scientists studying the fossil (see image) of a beaked whale discovered in desert of west Turkana in Kenya, say it is the most precisely dated beaked whale in the world, and the only stranded whale ever found so far inland on the African continent. The whale remains were dug up nearly 500 miles from the ocean, and so it is thought that the creature took a wrong turn and then swam up the ancient Anza river 17 million-years ago. 

The find sheds light on Africa’s ancient swamplands, and has also helped reveal when man first walked on two feet.  Scientists have now concluded that East Africa would have been flatter and wetter at that time, and covered in forest. At this key point in time the landscape then began to rise, the climate began to dry and the forests died away, leading primates living there to begin walking on their two rear limbs.

The ‘Turkana whale’ is estimated to have been 22ft (6.7 metres) long and it is believed to be related to its more modern cousins the Baird’s and Cuvier’s beaked whales.